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Scheme of Studies

Two Years (4 Semesters) Postgraduate Programme "M. Sc. Clinical Nutrition (CN)"

Effective from Academic Session 2015 (Autumn) and onwards

1st Year - 1st Semester

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-501  Recent advances in Clinical Nutrition  4(3+1*)
DCN-502  Vitamins and Minerals in Human Nutrition  4(3+1*)
DCN-503  Disease prevention through Nutrition  4(3+1*)
DCN-504  Community Nutrition  3(2+1*)
DCN-505  Nutrients and Metabolism  4(3+1*)
 Sub. Total  19

2nd Semester

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-601  Laboratory techniques in Human Nutrition  4(3+1*)
DCN-602  Clinical Nutrition  4(3+1*)
DCN-603  Dietetics-1  4(3+1*)
DCN-604  Research Methods in Human Nutrition  4(2+2*)
DCN-605  Protein Metabolism  3(2+1*)
 Sub. Total  19

2nd Year - 3rd Semester

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-701  Drug-Nutrient Interactions  2(2+0*)
DCN-702  Food Toxicology and Additives  3(2+1*)
DCN-703  Dietetics-II  3(2+1*)
DCN-704  Biotechnology in Nutrition and Dietetics  3(2+1*)
DCN-705  Public Health Nutrition  3(2+1*)
DCN-706  Traditional & Aboriginal Food  3(2+1*)
 Sub. Total  17

4th Semester

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-801  Community Project  3(0+3*)
DCN-802  Food and Drug Laws  2(2+0*)
DCN-803  Nutrition & Psychology  2(2+0*)
DCN-804  Nutritional Intervention Planning  3(2+1*)
DCN-805  Nutritional Education and Awareness  3(2+1*)
DCN-806  Sports Nutrition  3(2+1*)
 Sub. Total  16
 Total Credit Hours  71

NOTE:

  • Symbol represents credit hours for the practical.

DCN-501 - Recent Advances in Clinical Nutrition - 4(3+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to;

  1. Understand the role of macronutrients and micronutrients in normal physiological pathways.
  2. Identify and explain the role of specific nutrients in the metabolic pathways and in relation to major diseases.
  3. Identifying alternate feeding routes, their relation with the nutritional biochemistry and their application in a clinical setting.
  4. Design enteral and parenteral feeding regimens.

Theory:

Advanced study of principles of nutrition in relation to health and disease; The interrelationships of nutrition with biochemical, physiological and anatomical changes associated with acute, chronic, and terminal illness, surgery, and trauma are explored; Formulation of medical nutrition therapy through advanced nutritional management techniques plans using the Nutrition Care Process framework by determining nutrition diagnoses; Macro/micronutrient and fluid/electrolyte needs; Routes of feeding, and implementation plans; Clinical cases are used to address metabolic, nutrition status and patient applications, topics including diabetes, nutrition support; Enteral and parenteral nutrition; Surgery and critical care, burns, immunology, cancer, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, liver and renal diseases.

Recommended Books:

  1. Mahan, L. K. and S. Escott-Stump. 2008. Krause's Food & Nutrition Therapy, Elsevier Saunders
  2. Nelms, M. , Sucher K. 2010. Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology, Cengage Learning.
  3. Vishwanath M. S. 2011. Introduction to Clinical Nutrition. 3rd edition. Marcel Dekker, Inc. NY, USA.

DCN-502 - Vitamins and Minerals in Human Nutrition - 4(3+1*)

Theory:

Introduction to minerals and mineral metabolism, digestion, absorption and transport, functions, interactions with other nutrients and excretion. Absorption, function and metabolism of selected macro-minerals and trace elements; factors affecting requirements and interrelationships between minerals and trace elements. Deficiency and toxicity of minerals. Calcium and phosphorus: calcium and phosphorus turn over in man; absorption and factors affecting absorption; food sources; calcium homeostasis; interrelationships between calcium and phosphorus. Clinical disorders affecting calcium and phosphorus. General introduction and characterization of vitamins. Structure properties, source, absorption and metabolic function of vitamins. Effects of deficiencies or excesses of certain vitamins in humans. Control of food intake and energy balance and regulation.

Objectives of Course

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to:

  1. Understand the vitamins and minerals in human nutrition and their role in metabolism
  2. Discuss the deficiency diseases and toxicity levels and their food sources
  3. Explain the functions of vitamins and minerals in human body

Practical:

To understand what the dietary recommended intakes (DRIs) are for specific vitamins and minerals and how these values are derived.

Books Recommended:

  1. Shari, L. , Nancy P. B. 2003. Real Vitamin and Mineral Book. Avery Publisher 3rd Ed. 400pp ISBN-13: 9781583331521
  2. Consumer Guide, 1994. The Complete Book of Vitamins and Minerals. Publications International. ISBN-13: 9780451182135 ISBN: 0451182138

DCN-503 - Disease Prevention Through Nutrition - 4(3+1*)

Theory:

A study of nutrition and its related disorders: Under nutrition and starvation, obesity, protein energy malnutrition, rickets, osteomalacia, scurvy, beriberi, pellagra, nutritional anaemia, neuropathies, xerophthalmia, keratomalcia and blindness. Introduction of nutritional metabolic disorders. Principles of clinical dietetics management, medical terminology, medical documentation, design and implementation of nutrition care plans. Nutrition and the patient with cancer: the relationship of nutrition and breast cancer, colon cancers, prostate cancer and lung cancer. Nutrients role in prevention and development of cardiovascular disease. Dietary macronutrients and other dietary components and cardiovascular risk. Nutrition and congestive heart failure. Nutrition and bone health: the role of nutrition in the prevention of osteoporosis. The role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of obesity. Nutritional care in endocrine disorders: the role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of diabetes mellitus. The role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Obesity; genetics of human obesity, role of physical activity, macronutrient intake and body weight, behavioral risk factors for obesity, diet and physical activity, role of taste and appetite in body, weight regulation, obesity and risk for diabetes. Drug-nutrient interaction. Diet and hypertension. Nutritional support in disabling disease and rehabilitation.

Objectives of Course

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to:

  1. Explain different types and etiology of major nutritional disorders.
  2. Identify critical nutrients related to various diseases or conditions.
  3. Understand disease prevention guidelines for the major chronic diseases.
  4. Explain role of diet in the prevention of major nutritional disorders.
  5. Demonstrate appropriate communication skills, in the form of a presentation and nutrition education lectures.

Practical:

Students will develop handouts related to Nutrition Management. Gestational, nutritional prevention/management, GI tract disorders and nutrient considerations. Lactose intolerance and nutrient considerations. IBD. Nutrition and Liver Disease. Cancerprevention. Cardiovascular disease prevention nutrition. The medical record/nutrition care process. Eating disorders. Guidelines to maintain health.

Books Recommended:

  1. Coulston, A. M. Rock, C. L. and Monsen, E. R. 2001. Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease. New York: Academic Press.
  2. Birmingham, J. J. 1990. Medical Terminology: A Self-Learning Text. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: CV Mosby Company.
  3. Mahan, L. K. and Escott, S. S. 1996. Krause's Food, Nutrition and Diet Therapy. 10thed. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders.
  4. Pronsky, Z. M. 1997. Powers and Moore's Food Medication Interactions. 10thed. Pottstown, PA. : Food-Medication Interactions.
  5. Shils, M. E. , Shike, M. , Ross A. C. , Caballero, B. and Cousins, R. 2006. Modern Nutrition in health and disease. 10thed. Baltimore, MD; Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.
  6. Ananda, S. P. 1993. Essentials and Toxic trace elements in human health and disease: An update. Wiley- Liss Publishers, New York. Pp. 391.

DCN -504 - Community Nutrition - 3(2+1*)

Theory:

Fundamentals of community nutrition, the role of nutrition at the local, national and international levels. Current status of local and global food and nutrition problems; the factors that affect nutrition, consumer behavior, agricultural and industrial development, environment and population issues, national policies and international agreements. Principles and processes for nutrition intervention in the community. The factors that influence eating behavior and the approaches, the application of scientific principles to the procurement, storage, processing and service of institutional food. Controversies in the field of nutrition, e. g. , obesity and weight control, vitamin supplementation, vegetarianism, and fad diets etc. Energy Intake and weight control, nutrition and physical activity, nutrition and disease prevention. Food choices and human health.

Objectives of Course

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to:

  1. Describe Fundamentals of community nutrition, the role of nutrition at the local, national and international levels.
  2. Explain principles and processes for nutrition intervention in the community
  3. Describe Food choices and human health.

Books Recommended:

  1. Garrow, J. S. , James, W. P. T. and Ralph, A. 2000. Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 10th ed. Good Heart Publishing Co. , London, UK.
  2. Gopalan, C. 1994. Recent Trends in Nutrition. Oxford University Press, Lahore, Pakistan.
  3. Hdnhe, R. C. 2002. Prospects in improving Nutrition in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The World Bank Pub. , USA.

DCN-505 - Nutrients & Metabolism - 4(3+1*)

Theory:

Digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and fat, intestinal sugar transport, regulation of intestinal nutrient transport, intestinal lipid absorption, intestinal absorption of bile acids, enterohepatic circulation, energy metabolism in the human with emphasis on integration and regulation. The regulation of energy metabolism, four major pathways for energy production, effects on body metabolism of feasting, a low-carbohydrate diet, and a protein-sparing fast, effect of organ failure on intermediate metabolism, abnormal metabolism due to inherited defects in absorption, utilization, transport, and metabolism of selected nutrients. Energy metabolism, starvation, obesity, diabetes, energy expenditure estimation, the common methods of assessing body weight and body composition and the problems associated with overweight or underweight.

Course Objectives:

At the end of the course the students will be able to

  1. Describe digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and fat.
  2. Explain the regulation of energy metabolism in human body.
  3. Explain Energy metabolism, starvation, obesity, and diabetes and energy expenditure estimation.

Practical:

Determination of energy of different food recipes, calculation of basal metabolic rate

Books Recommended

  1. Robert, J. M. 2005. Lipid Metabolism and Health.
  2. David, A. B. 2002. Introduction to Nutrition and Metabolism. 3rd Ed.
  3. Gropper, S. S. , Smith, J. L. and Groff, J. L. 2005. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. 4th Ed Publisher: Wadsworth, Inc. ISBN13: 9780534559861.
  4. Ortigues, M. I. 2007. Energy and protein metabolism and nutrition - Eaap 124 EAAP Scientific Series - ISSN 0071-2477, Volume 124. PP. 646.

DCN -601 - Laboratory Techniques in Human Nutrition - 4(3+1*)

Practical:

Sampling and preparation for analysis. Proximate analysis for moisture, ash, silica, ether extract, crude protein and the use of micro- kjeldahl distillation apparatus. Crude fiber and nitrogen free extract. Determination of calcium, phosphorous, iron, vitamin A and Vitamin C. Qualitative examination of milk. Determination of total solids and ash. Determination of density and freezing point of milk. Determination of tritrableacidity. The protein, lactose and chlorides of milk. Chromatographic analysis. Circular chromatography, ascending single dimensional chromatography, descending single dimensional chromatography and two dimensional chromatography. Quantitative examination of blood. Determination of glucose, cholesterol, hemoglobin, iron and plasma proteins in blood. Urine, analysis. Detection of sugar, albumen, ketones, bile salts, total nitrogen, urea, creatinine and sulphur in the urine.

Objectives of Course

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to:

  1. Describe Sampling and preparation for analysis
  2. Analyze calcium, phosphorous, iron, vitamin A and Vitamin C. Qualitative examination of milk.
  3. Quantitative and qualitative examination of blood.

Books Recommended:

  1. Hawk P. B. , B. L Oser and H. W. Sumerson 1967. Practical physiological Chemistry. (14th Ed) McGraw Hill Book co. New York.
  2. Keinneth. H. 1990. Official Methods of analysis of the Association of analytical Chemistry. AOAC. Inc. Virginia. USA.
  3. Meyer, H. L. 1987. Food Chemistry CBS Publisher and Distributors Delhi.
  4. Murry, R. K. , D. K Grammer, P. A. Mayer and V. W. Rodwell. 1993. Biochemistry. (22nd Ed). Print ice Hall, U. K.

DCN -602 - Clinical Nutrition - 4(3+1*)

Theory:

The role of nutrition during the life cycle: as a risk factor in degenerative diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer, stroke, and heart disease. Diet for a healthy life style. Nutritional care for specific disease states like upper and lower gastrointestinal disorders, liver disease, respiratory disorders, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Food safety. Cholesterolcontroversy. Role of nutritional care in the management of selected disorders. The relationships among nutrition, aging and health. The etiology and treatment of various metabolic diseases using the principles of nutrition.

Objectives of Course

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to:

  1. Students will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate medical terminology when discussing various disease states.
  2. Show a working knowledge of pathophysiology, abnormal biochemistry, and altered nutrient metabolism in various disease states.
  3. Discuss the principles of nutrition screening, assessment, and medical nutrition therapy for various disease states. Medical nutrition therapy knowledge will include knowledge of how nutrient, fluid, electrolyte needs and feeding techniques are altered for each disease state.
  4. Devise nutrition care plans and define dietary modifications that are medically, culturally and aesthetically acceptable for individuals with various disease states.

Practical:

Students will analyze their own nutrient intake using computer software. Maternal and infant nutrition. Case studies appropriate to specific diseases. Formulating the vegetarian diets for obesity and for the athlete. Nutrition for modern living. Introducing to therapeutic nutritional care/service. Modifications of normal diet to meet special nutritional needs. Menu planning and documentation of nutritional care. A survey of human nutritional needs including nutrient requirements, nutrient functions and sources of nutrients in foods.

Books Recommended:

  1. Gibney, M. J. Elia, M. , Ljungquist, O. and Dowsett, J. 2005. Clinical Nutrition. Black well Publishing Co. , Oxford, UK. PP. 496.
  2. Shils, M. E. , Shike, M. , Ross A. C. , Caballero, B. , and Cousins, R. 2006. Modern Nutrition in Health and Hisease. 10th Ed. Baltimore, MD; Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.
  3. Widdowson, E. M. and Mathers, J. 1992. The Contribution of Nutrition to human and Animal Health. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England. PP-407.
  4. Labodarios, D. and Haffejee, A. , 1994. Hand Book of Clinical Nutrition. Oxford University Press, Lahore, Pakistan

DCN-603 - Dietetics-1 - 4(3+1*)

Theory:

Principles of clinical dietetics management, medical terminology, medical documentation, design and implementation of nutrition care plans. Begin the application of principles of clinical nutrition to the treatment of disease, drug-nutrient interaction, nutrition assessment and nutritional support. Identify risks for development of chronic disease, including life style choices. Nutritional needs of the patient and apply to specific clinical situations. Nutrition in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, nutritional care in disorders of renal system. Nutrition in surgery and burns, nutritional support for burns. Nutritional care in disorders of the immune system (AIDS). Nutrition in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Nutrition in pulmonary disease. Diseases of infancy and childhood, inborn errors of metabolism and nutritional care of the child with a birth defect. Geriatrics nutritional considerations. Relationship between diseases processes and food intake and the changes in intake required in treatment.

Objectives of Course

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to:

  1. Describe, interpret and be able to apply various nutritional assessment methods to evaluate nutritional status of individuals.
  2. Develop viable nutrition care plans for patients with special conditions requiring nutritional modification for the promotion of health.
  3. Devise appropriate nutritional support regimens for patients who are unable to meet their nutritional requirements.
  4. Review and evaluate research underpinning the dietary management of diseases

Practical:

Formulate nutrient needs at various times in life and effects of socio-economic and cultural background in planning therapeutic diets for the patient or client. Plan, adopt and adjust nutritionally balanced diets for patients carrying various diseases and apply to specific clinical situations. Appropriate method of feeding and to calculate maternal and parenteral nutrition formulations. Apply dietetic information to individual clinical situations through the use of case studies and diet calculations. An examination of the special nutritional needs of the elderly with emphasis on the different needs of the various subgroups that comprise the elderly today.

Books Recommended:

  1. Birmingham J. J. 1990. Medical Terminology: A Self-Learning Text. 2nd edition. Philadelphia: CV Mosby Company.
  2. Mahan, L. K and Escott-Stump, S. 1996. Krause's Food, Nutrition and Diet Therapy. 10thed. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders.
  3. Pronsky, Z. M. 1993. Powers and Moore's Food Medication Interactions. 8th edition. Pottstown, PA. : Food-Medication Interactions.
  4. Zeman, F. J. Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics. 2nd edition. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. ; 1991.
  5. Phyllis, A. B. 2000. Prescription for Nutritional Healing. Avery penguin Putnam Inc. , New York, USA.
  6. Garrow, J. S. & James, W. P. T. 1993. Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Churchill Livinstone, Edinburgh.

DCN -604 - Research Methods in Human Nutrition - 4(2+2*)

Theory:

An introduction to the research process and its application to research in human nutrition. Students will complete a research project of their choice, encompassing the major components of research activity, including a review of the literature, hypotheses generation, data collection and analysis, and discussion. Emphasis will be placed on how to define and approach research problems in a way consistent with the practice of human nutrition professionals. Experience with the use of the SPSS-X computer program is provided.

Course Objectives:

At the end of course teaching, completion of independent study assignments and appropriate amount of group work, a student will be able to:

  • Prepare various assignments, special problem report, case study report, poster, conference proceeding abstract, research paper, review paper, research proposal / synopsis, research thesis / dissertation, presentations etc.
  • Effectively deliver various scientific presentations like oral, poster, case study, seminar, etc.
  • Discuss various methods & designs of research in the Disciplines of Nutrition, Dietetics & Food Science etc.
  • Articulate & decide the best method / design to research an issue of interest in Nutrition, Dietetics & Food Science
  • Statistically analyse research data, interpret & comprehend the results and present in appropriate format for various research presentations / publications
  • Review various scientific presentations like research paper, review paper, case study, research note, research brief etc.
  • Properly communicate (enhanced communication skills) through frequent opportunities to practice different forms of communication

DCN-605 - Protein Metabolism - 3(2+1*)

Learning Objectives:

At the end of the course the students will be able to

  1. Describe digestion and absorption of proteins in human body.
  2. Explain nutritional and endocrine regulation of protein synthesis and degradation, protein quality assessment, protein status, protein-energy malnutrition.
  3. Identify defects in protein and amino acid metabolism.

Theory:

Digestion and absorption of proteins, intestinal amino acids and protein transport, absorption of intact proteins and peptides, regulation of intestinal nutrient transport. Nutritional and endocrine regulation of protein synthesis and degradation, protein quality assessment, protein status, protein-energy malnutrition. Protein metabolism during exercise. Metabolism, digestion, and absorption of amino acids and proteins. Inter-and intra-organ amino acid metabolism; amino acids as therapies in cachexia and other muscle-wasting conditions. Defects in protein and amino acid metabolism underlie or exacerbate several metabolic and other forms of diseases, including obesity, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Practical:

Analysis of NPN and true protein in foods. In-vitro pepsin solubility measurement. Techniques for estimation of protein requirements.

Books Recommended:

  1. David, A. Bender. 2002. Introduction to Nutrition and Metabolism.
  2. Luc, A, Cynober. 2003. Metabolic and Therapeutic Aspects of Amino Acids in Clinical Nutrition. 2nd Ed.
  3. Gropper, S. S. , Smith, J. L. and Groff, James L. 2005. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. 4th Ed. Wadsworth, Inc. ISBN13: 9780534559861.
  4. Ortigues-Marty . I . 2007. Energy and protein metabolism and nutrition - Eaap 124 EAAP Scientific Series - ISSN 0071-2477, PP. 646.

DCN-701 - Drug-Nutrient Interactions - 2(2+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to;

  1. Describe the routes of drug administration and factors that might alter drug absorption and bioavailability.
  2. Describe the effects of various drugs on action, metabolism and elimination of nutrients and the effect of nutrients on the metabolism and absorption of drug.
  3. Identify the risk factors for drug-nutrient interactions
  4. Explain the effects of drug therapy on the nutritional status of patients.

Theory:

Basic definitions and concepts, role of nutrition therapy in pharmacotherapy; Pharmacologic aspects of food and drug interactions; Routes of drug administration; Drug mechanism Pharmacodynamics; Pharmacokinetics, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination; Effects of food on drug therapy, drug absorption, drug distribution, drug metabolism and drug excretion; Effects of drugs on food and nutrition, nutrient absorption, metabolism and excretion; Effects of drugs on the nutritional status of patients e. g. taste, smell and type of intake; Gastrointestinal effects, appetite changes; Nutrient assessment of drug-nutrient interactions; Dietary counseling for the prevention of food drug interactions.

Recommended Books

  1. Mahan, L. K. and Escott-Stump S. 2008. Krause's Food & Nutrition Therapy, Elsevier Saunders.
  2. Nelms M. , Sucher K. 2010. Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology, Cengage Learning.
  3. McCabe, J Beverly, Frankel, H Eric. 2003. Handbook of Food-Drug Interactions, CRC press.

DCN -702 - Food Toxicology and Additives - 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have knowledge of;

  1. Different food additives, their permissible limits and safety assessment
  2. CODEX Alimantarius and FDA rules for food additives

Theory:

Introduction to food toxicology; Concepts of toxicology; Dose-response relationship; Pesticide residues in food, absorption, distribution and storage of toxicants; Animal drug residues in food; Veterinary medicine, risks and benefits; Toxicants formed during food processing, biotransformation and elimination of toxicants; Target organ toxicity; Teratogenesis, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, toxic reactions with the molecules of life; Natural toxins in plants and fungi, mold and mycotoxins, marine toxins in food; Naturally occurring toxicants; Etiologic agents of foodborne diseases, bacterial toxigenesis; Food allergy, the basics of food allergens and their effects; Food intolerance and metabolic disorders; Food additives, introduction, types, classification; Food additive safety assessment; Toxicology of selected food additives, preservatives, emulsifiers, flavoring agents, antifoaming, anticaking, antioxidants, bleaching, coloring agents, sweeteners and thickeners; Safety, controlling and regulation of food additives according to CODEX alimentariusand FDA etc.

Practical:

Determination of sulphur dioxide, sodium benzoate, sodium chloride in food samples; Pesticide residues in plant products; Detection of veterinary medicine residues in milk and meat; Heavy metals in water sample; Determination of natural colors.

Recommended Books:

  1. Fergus M. C. 1996. Food Additives: Toxicology, Regulation, and Properties. CRC Press.
  2. Stanley T. O. 2004. Food and Nutritional Toxicology. CRC Press.
  3. Jim S. and Lily H-S. 2011. Food Additives Data Book. 2nd ed. Willey Blackwell publisher.

DCN -703 - Dietetics-2 - 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to;

  1. Employ and implement nutritional assessment in a clinical setting.
  2. Formulate nutritional management plans for various disease states keeping in mind the disease pathophysioloy, abnormal biochemical status and altered metabolism.
  3. Develop the ability to compose individualized therapeutic diets for texture, consistency and composition which are disease specific, culturally and aesthetically acceptable.
  4. Discuss disease prevention guidelines for major and chronic diseases.
  5. Discuss the importance of nutritional counseling in the prevention of chronic diseases.
  6. Explain the role of nutritional counseling in modifying dietary behavior and lifestyle

Theory:

Diet therapy, principles of diet therapy, modification of normal diet to therapeutic diets, dietary modifications in fevers and infections, modified energy diets; Obesity and malnutrition; Diets in the diseases of the gastrointestinal system; Peptic ulcer, gastritis, constipation, diarrhea, mal+absorption syndrome; Celiac disease, lactose intolerance, diets in cardiovascular diseases; Ischemic heart diseases, Dyslipidemia, hypertension; Diet in renal diseases; Dietary modifications in diabetes mellitus; Diet in the liver diseases; Hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease; Diet in surgical conditions; Pre+operative and post+operative; Diets in inborn errors of metabolism; Diet in deficiency states; Anemia, protein energy malnutrition. Inpatient counseling; Short term and long term nutritional counseling; Diet counseling for prevention of obesity, diabetes, renal diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and bone diseases; Simulation techniques for counseling in selected settings.

Practical:

Planning a normal diet, texture modified diets; Clear fluid diet, full fluid diet, soft diet, semi+solid diet; Energy modified diets, high calorie diet, restricted calorie diet, bland diet, high fiber diet, low residue diet; Modified carbohydrates diet, moderate carbohydrate diet; Modified proteins diet, high protein diet, restricted protein diet; Modified fats diet, restricted fats diet; Modified micronutrients diet, controlled sodium, potassium and phosphorus diet.

Recommended Books:

  1. Rolfes S. R. , Pinna K. 2006. Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition, Thomson/Wadsworth.
  2. Mahan L. K. and Escott+Stump S. 2008. Krause's Food & Nutrition Therapy, Elsevier Saunders.
  3. Whitney E. N. and Rolfes S. R. 2008. Understanding Nutrition, Thomson Higher Education.
  4. King K. and Helm K. K. 2007. Nutrition Therapy: Advanced Counseling Skills, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

DCN -704 - Biotechnology in Nutrition and Dietetics - 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

After attending this course and completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to know about;

  1. Biotechnology, its important areas in food and nutrition. And how the major components of food and functional foods can be produced using microorganisms?
  2. Food bio+preservatives and the importance of fermentation and starter cultures?
  3. Genetically modified foods, plants and microbes, how they can be produced and what is their role in food and nutrition.

Theory:

Food biotechnology, definition, history, world economics; Future potential and micro+organisms used in food and nutrition biotechnology; Fermentation, role in food processing and nutrition; Starter cultures, their criteria and important starter cultures for food fermentations; Major components of human nutrition and their production using biotechnological approaches; Food additives, colour, flavor, their production through biotechnological approach; Production of microbial polysaccharides and polyunsaturated fatty acids; Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria; Genetically modified microbes and foods, consumer awareness regarding GM foods; Biotechnology and food related disorders.

Practical:

Preparation of selective media for the growth of lactobacilli; Conversion of simple sugars to value added products like prebiotics; Efficacy evaluation of prebiotics; Enzymatic synthesis of prebiotics e. g. galacto+oligosaccharides and fructo+oligosaccharides.

Recommended Books:

  1. Shetty K. , Paliyath G. , Pommeto, Levin, R. E. 2006. Food Biotechnology. 2nd edition. Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
  2. Stahl U. , Donalies U. E. B. , and Nevoigt E. 2008. Food Biotechnology. Advances in Biochemical Engineering /Biotechnology. Springer+Verlag Berlin Heiderberg.

DCN-705 - Public Health Nutrition - 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to;

  1. Learn the core concepts in public health and understand how they have been and are currently applied to nutrition.
  2. Understand how health problems related to nutrition are assessed at the population level
  3. Explain the global public health issues with emphasis on our local scenario.

Theory:

History of medicine and birth of public health concept; Changing concepts in public health and foundations of public health nutrition, applying concept of health and disease; Concepts of control+disease control, disease elimination, disease eradication, monitoring and surveillance; Levels of prevention, modes of intervention; Principles of epidemiology and epidemiological methods+observational studies (Descriptive and analytical); Experimental or interventional studies (Randomized clinical trials, community intervention studies), concept of association and causation; Disease prevention and control system; Demography+demographic cycle; The importance of public health nutrition programs in preventing disease and promoting adult health; Nutritional problems of public health, (global and local)+ low birth weight, Protein energy malnutrition, Xerophalmia, Nutritional anemia; Iodine deficiency disorders, Beriberi and thiamine deficiency; Pellagra; Rickets and osteomalacia; Scurvy; Zinc deficiency; Dental caries and fluorosis; Nutritional neuropathies; Riboflavin deficiency; vitamin B6 deficiency; Minor nutritional disorders and clinical signs.

Practical:

Design a project using one of the epidemiological methods to investigate the nutritional problem in local community and present it with suggested solutions.

Books Recommended:

  1. Michael J. G. , Barrie M. M. , John N. K. and Lenore A. 2004. Public Health Nutrition. Wiley Blackwell
  2. Sari E. 2011. Nutrition in Public Health, A Handbook for Developing Programs and Services. 3rd edition. Jones and Bartlett Learning International, London, UK.
  3. Mark L. and Worsley T. (Editors). Public Health Nutrition, From Principles to Practice. Allen &Unwin Book Publishers, Australia

DCN-706 - Traditional and Aboriginal Foods - 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

After studying this courseand completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, student`s abilities will be empowered in the following fields;

  1. Traditional foods in different parts of the world, what peoples think about these foods and impact of religion/belief.
  2. Important traditional foods of Pakistan, their major components and their impact on health.
  3. Practical analysis of some important traditional foods of Pakistan.

Theory:

Introduction to traditional and aboriginal foods; Ethical considerations and climate factors and their effect on cultural foods; Worldwide traditional foods, nutritional facts and health; Traditional foods in Asia, traditional recipes, their nutritional considerations and their impact of health; Pakistani traditional foods from all provinces, typical recipes like sarsonkasaag, corn flour chapattis, panjeeri, their nutrients and impact on health; Thinking's related these foods, nutritional value of these products; Effect of modernization and fast foods on these traditional recipes.

Practical:

Estimation of calorific values of some traditional foods like sarsonkasaag, makaiki roti, etc. ; Survey in the community to take views for these local recipes, evaluation of some local foods to access their nutritional contents and energy value

Books Recommended:

  1. Ronald F. And Schmid N. D. 1997. Traditional Foods are your Best Medicine: Improving Health and Longevity with Native Nutrition. Inner Traditions.
  2. Pamela G. K. , Sucher K. P. and Nelms M. N. 2012. Food and Culture. 6th edition. Wadsworth Cengag Learning, Belmont, USA.

DCN - 801 - Community Project - 3(0+3*)

Objectives:

  • To choose and describe appropriate strategies for nutrition interventions.
  • To evaluate the process and impact of a nutrition intervention.
  • To prepare a budget for the development and evaluation of a nutrition intervention.
  • To prepare a grant proposal requesting funds for a community nutrition intervention.

Theory

This class provides students with the tools for developing community nutrition interventions. Students will learn about utilizing behavioral theory, conducting needs assessments, writing program objectives, developing intervention strategies, evaluating program implementation and effectiveness, planning a budget, and writing grant proposals. Students pick their projects based on their personal interests and work in small groups of students. Previous examples include: obesity prevention for school+aged children, eating disorder prevention for adolescent girls; increasing whole+grain consumption in college students, and increasing fruit and vegetable intake in preschoolers.

DCN- 802 - Food and Drug Laws - 2(2+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have knowledge of;

  1. Basics concepts of food and drug Food laws and Regulation
  2. World food and drug laws and situation in Pakistan

Theory:

Introduction to Punjab pure food rules; Legal terms and definitions from the food industry, like bakery, dairy, homogenized milk, processing aid, food testing laboratory, etc. ; Rules for food additives, categories like gelling agent, bulking agent, anti-foaming agent, colours, flavours, etc. , Permissible limits for these agents; Rules for food preservatives, limits; Food packaging rules, criteria for packaging material, labeling criteria; Duties and responsibilities of public analysts and food inspectors, current situation; Regulations for different food industry products.

Pakistan drug act, 1976 and all the regulations frames the under e. g. registration, sale, import and export of drugs, etc. ; All basic definitions in drugs act 1976; Procedures of drug inspectors and their powers; Penalties and procedures.

Recommended books:

  1. Punjab Pure Food Rules, 2011
  2. Goodburn, K. 2001. EU Food Law: A Practical Guide. Woodhead publishing Ltd. CRC press. Boca Raton New York, USA.
  3. Fortin N. D. 2009. Food Regulation: Law, Science, Policy, and Practice. John Willey & Sons, Inc. , Hoboken, New Jersey, USA.
  4. Peter B. H. , Merrill R. A. and Grossman L. A. 2007. Food and Drug Law. Foundation press

DCN-803 - Nutrition and Psychology - 2 (2+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have knowledge of;

  1. Psychology, its types and importance in nutrition.
  2. Psychological influences on appetite, attitude behavior relationship.

Theory:

Introduction to psychology, types and classification; Psychology and nutrition adherence; Attitude and eating patterns and the field of cognitive psychology; Perception, visualization and eating patterns, errors in perception process; Eating disorders, diagnosis, assessment and treatment; Face perception; Model of food choice, a conceptual model of the food choice; Psychological influences on appetite; Process over the life course, integration of biological, social, cultural and psychological influences on food choice; Attitude behavior relationship; Measurement issues, indirect effects of attitude on behavior; The theory of reasoned action; Additional variables within the theory of planned behavior.

Recommended books:

  1. David B. . 1994. The Psychology of Nutrition. Taylor and Francis.
  2. Jane O. 2010. The Psychology of Eating: From Healthy to Disorders Behavior. 2nd Edition. Wiley Blackwell.
  3. Melinda C. B. and Colleen A. K. 2010. Nutrition Psychology: Improving dietary adherence. Jones and Bartlett Learning Publishers.

DCN-804 - Nutrition Intervention Planning - 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able;

  1. To understand basis of epidemiological concepts and their application.
  2. To conduct community assessment, policy development and implement in novel situations

Theory:

Definition of epidemiology, its principles, uses, methods, observational epidemiology-descriptive and analytical studies; Cross-sectional studies, case control studies, cohort studies, comparison and advantages/disadvantages of case-control and cohort studies; Experimental/ interventional epidemiology-randomized clinical trials; Community based interventional studies; Planning process- assessment of community nutritional problems; Prioritizing the problem, defining objectives, planning, implementing, monitoring, evaluation and reporting; Food policy councils, Building bridges with other departments.

Practical:

A complete nutrition intervention planning procedure will be followed practically. First step will include plan of descriptive epidemiological study to generate a hypothesis, and at second step the analytical or experimental studies will be planned with budgeting etc.

The specimen of PC-1 submitted by different organizations will also be discussed and analyzed.

Books Recommended:

  1. Walter W. 1998. Nutritional Epidemiology. Oxford University Press, USA; 2nd edition.
  2. Richard D. S. andMartin W. B. 2001. Nutrition and Health in Developing Countries (Nutrition and Health) Humana Press.

DCN-805 - Nutritional Education and Awareness - 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able;

  1. To learn the techniques of creating awareness about health issues in masses
  2. To learn about different modes of communication and their effective use
  3. To understand the ethical responsibilities for dissemination of knowledge

Theory:

Definingnutrition education, history, need of nutrition education; Nutrition education programme, scope and challenges of educating people about eating well; Implications for competencies and skills for nutrition education; Biological influences, cultural and social preferences; Family and psychological factors; Expectancy-value theories of motivation, social and cognitive theory; Behavior change as a process, phases of change; Addressing multiple and overlapping influences on behavior; A logical model approach for planning a framework of nutrition education; Understanding communication model, preparing/organizing oral presentations, delivering oral presentation, delivering nutrition education workshops, types of supporting visual aids, nutrition mass media communication campaigns, social marketing; Ethics in nutrition education, conflicts, participating process in community coalition; Non-government and public health organizations and their current programmes.

Practical:

Nutritional counseling; Programme designing for specific diseases like Anemia, Neural tube defects, rickets, etc. ; Surveys and seminars in different educational institutions; Individual presentations by students on different nutrition topics.

Books Recommended:

  1. Walter W. 1998. Nutritional Epidemiology. 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, USA.
  2. Richard D. S. and Martin W. B. 2001. Nutrition and Health in Developing Countries (Nutrition and Health) Humana Press.

DCN -806 - Sports Nutrition - 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have understanding of;

  1. Energy requirements of athletes, body builders, etc.
  2. Examine methods of increasing muscle mass and to assess the use of sports supplements

Theory:

The principles of fitness, motivation and conditioning; Nutrition for the athletes, stress management, preventing accidents, stretching, posture and aerobics; Vitamins and minerals supplementation for fitness; High and low intensity exercise, cross training, walking for weight control and case studies; Introduction to muscle contraction, fast and slow fibers, how and where energy is stored? How far can a person run? What fuels are used for exercise?; When is each fuel used, different intensity, duration, training, nutrition and gender?; Energy balance, fluid balance, fueling cycle, what can food does for you?; Pre-exercise, during exercise and during recovery; Athletes eating plan, calorie goals, calorie values, carbohydrate goals, protein goals, fat, vitamins and mineral goals; Sports drink and supplementation; My pyramid- for sports man; National and international regulations for supplements.

Practical:

Diet planning for different sportsmen like body builders, athletes, swimmers, etc.

Recommended Books:

  1. Ronald J. M. 2000. Nutrition in Sport. Blackwell Science Ltd.
  2. Judy A. D. 2007. Sports Nutrition Fats and Proteins. CRC Press Taylor and Francis Group.
  3. Heather H. F. , Burgoon L. and Mikesky A. E. 2008. Practical Applications in Sports Nutrition. 3rd edition. Jones & Bartlett Learning Publishers, London, UK.

 

Scheme of Studies

M. Phil Clinical Nutrition (MPCN) Two Years post-graduation program

Effective from Academic Session 2015 (Autumn) and onwards

Semester I

Course Code  Course Title  Credit Hours
MPCN-101  Biotechnological approaches in Food & Nutrition  3(2+1*)
MPCN-102  Biochemistry & Physiology of Human Body  3(2+1*)
MPCN-103  Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals  3(2+1*)
MPCN-104  Laboratory Techniques in Human Nutrition  3(2+1*)
MPCN-105  Advanced Biostatistics  3(3+0*)

Total

 15

Semester II

Course Code  Course Title  Credit Hours

MPCN-201

 Vitamins and Minerals in Human Nutrition

 3(2+1*)

MPCN-202

 Disease Prevention through Nutrition

 4(3+1*)

MPCN-203

 Research Methods in Human Nutrition

 3(2+1*)

MPCN-204

 Protein Metabolism

 3(2+1*)

MPCN-205

 Maternal and Pediatric Nutrition

 2(2+0*)

Total

 15

Semester III & IV

Course Code  Course Title  Credit Hours
MPCN-301  Seminar sem III  1
MPCN-401  Seminar sem IV  1
MPCN-402  Research and Thesis  6(0+6*)
Total  8
Total Credit Hours  37

NOTE

  • Symbol represents credit hours for practical.

 

MPCN-102  Biochemistry and Physiology of Human Body 3(2+1*)

Theory:

Digestive system: Structure & functions of different parts digestion and absorption, functions of liver and role of bile. Introduction to biochemistry, identify characteristics of common chemical compounds important in human biochemistry. The characteristics of major biochemical groups, including carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Cell physiology: The Cell, structure & function, Skin and thermoregulation, skin structure and functions and sweat glands. Blood Heart and circulation constitutes and functions of blood structure and functions of heart, Vascular circulatory system, Nervous system; functions of central nervous system and reflex action. The characteristics of chemicals which control biological processes in humans, including enzymes and hormones. The role of nucleic acids in the biology of humans. The role of thermo-regulation in humans. Excretory system: structure and functions of kidney and urine formation. Respiratory system: structure and functions of respiratory system. The characteristics of acidity and alkalinity in relation to humans.

Practical:

Identify applications and uses for biochemical processes and products. Hematology, cell count, Hb determination. Blood groups. Analysis of saliva and urine. Blood pressure, respiration rate, pulse and heart beat recording. Blood biochemistry

Books Recommended:

  1. Cutterige J. M. 1994. Antioxidants: Free Radicals in Nutrition, Health & Disease, Oxford Univ. Press. Pakistan Branch, Lahore.
  2. Lauralee, S. 2001. Human Physiology from cells to systems, 4th Ed, Brooks/Cole, Pacific Grove, C. A. , ISBN 0 314 092455.
  3. Pechenik, J. A. 2001. A Short Guide to Writing about Biology, 4th Ed, Longman, N. Y, ISBN 0 321 07843 8.
  4. Hoey, A. , Guerrini, V. and Holroyd, S. 2002. Mammalian Physiology I, Instructional Guide, USQ Publication.
  5. Fox and Ira, S. 2008. Human Physiology, 10th Ed. , WCB/McGraw-Hill Company, Publishers, Dubuque, Iowa.
  6. Keele, C. A. 1982. Samsoon Wright's Applied Physiology, (13th Ed) Oxford Univ. Press. London.

MPCN-204 - Protein Metabolism - 3 (2+1*)

Theory:

Digestion and absorption of proteins, intestinal amino acids and protein transport, absorption of intact proteins and peptides, regulation of intestinal nutrient transport. Nutritional and endocrine regulation of protein synthesis and degradation, protein quality assessment, protein status, protein-energy malnutrition. Protein metabolism during exercise. Metabolism, digestion, and absorption of amino acids and proteins. Inter-and intra-organ amino acid metabolism; amino acids as therapies in cachexia and other muscle-wasting conditions. Defects in protein and amino acid metabolism underlie or exacerbate several metabolic and other forms of diseases, including obesity, type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Practical:

Analysis of NPN and true protein in foods. In-vitro pepsin solubility measurement. Techniques for estimation of protein requirements.

Books Recommended:

  1. David, A. Bender. 2002. Introduction to Nutrition and Metabolism.
  2. Luc, A, Cynober. 2003. Metabolic and Therapeutic Aspects of Amino Acids in Clinical Nutrition. 2nd Ed.
  3. Gropper, S. S. , Smith, J. L. and Groff, James L. 2005. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism. 4th Ed. Wadsworth, Inc. ISBN13: 9780534559861.
  4. Ortigues-Marty . I . 2007. Energy and protein metabolism and nutrition - Eaap 124 EAAP Scientific Series - ISSN 0071-2477, PP. 646.

MPCN-201 - Vitamins and Minerals in Human Nutrition - 3 (2+1*)

Theory:

Introduction to minerals and mineral metabolism, digestion, absorption and transport, functions, interactions with other nutrients and excretion. Absorption, function and metabolism of selected macro-minerals and trace elements; factors affecting requirements and interrelationships between minerals and trace elements. Deficiency and toxicity of minerals. Calcium and phosphorus: calcium and phosphorus turn over in man; absorption and factors affecting absorption; food sources; calcium homeostasis; interrelationships between calcium and phosphorus. Clinical disorders affecting calcium and phosphorus. General introduction and characterization of vitamins. Structure properties, source, absorption and metabolic function of vitamins. Effects of deficiencies or excesses of certain vitamins in humans. Control of food intake and energy balance and regulation.

Practical:

To understand what the dietary recommended intakes (DRIs) are for specific vitamins and minerals and how these values are derived.

Books Recommended:

  1. Shari, L. , Nancy P. B. 2003. Real Vitamin and Mineral Book. Avery Publisher 3rd Ed. 400pp ISBN-13: 9781583331521
  2. Consumer Guide, 1994. The Complete Book of Vitamins and Minerals. Publications International. ISBN-13: 9780451182135 ISBN: 0451182138
  3. George, F. M B. 2005. Vitamin In Foods, Analysis Bioavailability, and Stability.
  4. Ronald, E. , Lin, Ye and Landen- JR, W. O. 2007. Vitamin Analysis for the Heath and Food Sciences. 2nded.
  5. Basu, T. K. and Dickerson, J. W. T. 1996. Vitamins in Human Health and Disease. CA.

MPCN-202 - Disease Prevention through Nutrition - 4 (3+1*)

Theory:

A study of nutrition and its related disorders: Under nutrition and starvation, obesity, protein energy malnutrition, rickets, osteomalacia, scurvy, beriberi, pellagra, nutritional anaemia, neuropathies, xerophthalmia, keratomalcia and blindness. Introduction of nutritional metabolic disorders. Principles of clinical dietetics management, medical terminology, medical documentation, design and implementation of nutrition care plans. Nutrition and the patient with cancer: the relationship of nutrition and breast cancer, colon cancers, prostate cancer and lung cancer. Nutrients role in prevention and development of cardiovascular disease. Dietary macronutrients and other dietary components and cardiovascular risk. Nutrition and congestive heart failure. Nutrition and bone health: the role of nutrition in the prevention of osteoporosis. The role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of obesity. Nutritional care in endocrine disorders: the role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of diabetes mellitus. The role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. Obesity; genetics of human obesity, role of physical activity, macronutrient intake and body weight, behavioral risk factors for obesity, diet and physical activity, role of taste and appetite in body, weight regulation, obesity and risk for diabetes. Drug-nutrient interaction. Diet and hypertension. Nutritional support in disabling disease and rehabilitation.

Practical:

Students will develop handouts related to Nutrition Management. Gestational, nutritional prevention/management, GI tract disorders and nutrient considerations. Lactose intolerance and nutrient considerations. IBD. Nutrition and Liver Disease. Cancer prevention. Cardiovascular disease prevention nutrition. The medical record/nutrition care process. Eating disorders. Guidelines to maintain health.

Books Recommended:

  1. Coulston, A. M. Rock, C. L. and Monsen, E. R. 2001. Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease. New York: Academic Press.
  2. Birmingham, J. J. 1990. Medical Terminology: A Self-Learning Text. 2nd ed. Philadelphia: CV Mosby Company.

MPCN -103 - Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals - 3 (2+1*)

Theory:

Understanding of nutraceutical industry, including social, cultural and regulatory issues, fundamental terminology and concepts used in food processing. Fundamental principles of pharmacology, including pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic phases. Role of major organs of digestion and primary metabolism of ingested materials, vitamins and minerals and describe areas of metabolic function. Herb / botanical products and comprehend key issues of harvest, manufacture, processing analysis and usage. The role of functional foods with an emphasis on the unique regulatory environment. Understanding and keep pace with a complex and rapidly changing market place for nutraceutical and functional food products, complex regulatory environment for nutraceutical products in Pakistan as compared to international markets, interpreting health claims information and regulatory requirements for labeling.

Practical

To update the students about advances in functional foods, which will play a significant and major role in health management of rapidly escalating population, which is projected to increase to 9 billion by 2050. To attract students to adopt the functional food research area to develop cutting-edge research expertise in this area in the country. To improve the knowledge of students about therapeutic value of natural functional foods like garlic, onion, ginger, soybean, tea, camel milk, yogurt etc. To acquaint the students about safety, dosage, prescription and efficacy assessment of various nutraceuticals/ functional foods to prevent/cure various chronic diseases

Books Recommended:

  1. Robert, A. D. 2004. Hand Book of Minerals as Nutritional Supplements.
  2. Mauro, D. 1997. Amino Acids and Proteins for the Athlete. The Anabolic Edge.
  3. Organic Chemistry, 2005. 6th Ed. - Fessenden - Brooks/Cole Publishing, ISBN -0-534-35199-9.

MPCN -203 - Research Methods in Human Nutrition - 3 (2+1*)

Theory:

An introduction to the research process and its application to research in human nutrition. Students will complete a research project of their choice, encompassing the major components of research activity, including a review of the literature, hypotheses generation, data collection and analysis, and discussion. Emphasis will be placed on how to define and approach research problems in a way consistent with the practice of human nutrition professionals. Experience with the use of the SPSS-X computer program is provided.

Practical:

Prepare various assignments, special problem report, case study report, poster, conference proceeding abstract, research paper, review paper, research proposal / synopsis, research thesis / dissertation, presentations etc. Effectively deliver various scientific presentations like oral, poster, case study, seminar, etc. Discuss various methods & designs of research in the Disciplines of Nutrition, Dietetics & Food Science etc. Articulate & decide the best method / design to research an issue of interest in Nutrition, Dietetics & Food Science Statistically analyse research data, interpret & comprehend the results and present in appropriate format for various research presentations / publications

Recommended books:

  1. Hawk P. B. , B. L Oser and H. W. Sumerson 1967. Research Methodology. (14th Ed) McGraw Hill Book co. New York.
  2. Keinneth. H. 1990. Official Methods of analysis of data. AOAC. Inc. Virginia. USA.

MPCN-101 - Biotechnological Approaches in Food and Nutrition - 3 (2+1*)

Theory:

Food biotechnology-definition, history, world economics, future potential and micro-organisms used in food and nutrition biotechnology. Food biopreservation and fermentation techniques using lactic acid bacteria e. g. bacteriocins, and organic acids. Starter cultures, importance of fermented foods and selection and quality criteria for starter cultures. Major components of human nutrition and their production using biotechnological approaches. Production and importance of organic acids in foods through lactic acid bacteria e. g. lactic and acetic acid fermentations. Food flavours, their importance in food processing, economy and production of natural or food graded flavours. Natural and artificial sweeteners and oligosaccharides produced using biotechnological approaches. The production of microbial polysaccharides and their importance in food industry. The microbial production of single cell oils and fats especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA's). The processes involved in the microbial production of important essential amino acids. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for the excess production of important food components. Genetically modified plants, how they are produced, resistance against diseases and worldwide acceptance of GM crops. Genetically modified microbes and expression systems for enough production of required proteins.

Practical:

Preparation of selective media for the growth of lactobacilli. Conversion of easy sugars to value added products like prebiotics. Production and characterization of an enzyme like beta-galactosidase. Enzymatic synthesis of prebiotics e. g. galacto-oligosaccharides and fructo-oligosaccharides.

Books Recommended

  1. Shetty, K. ; Paliyath, G. ; Pommeto, . ; Levin, R. E. Food biotechnology. 2nd edition, 2006. Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
  2. Stahl, U. ; Donalies, U. E. B. ; Nevoigt, E. Food biotechnology. Advances in biochemical engineering /biotechnology. 2008. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heiderberg.

MPCN-105 - Advanced Biostatistics - 3 (3+0*)

Theory:

Introduction of statistics; Types of data (scales of measurements), Frequency distribution for continuous and discrete data; Visual representation of data, stem and leaf display, box and whisker plots; Measures of location and variability, moments, skewness, coefficient of skewness and kurtosis; Definitions and laws of probability; Simple correlation and regression analysis; Elementary ideas of sampling, distribution of means and proportions; Test of significance of means, proportion, difference between means and difference between proportions with their confidence intervals; Experimental design (Completely Randomized Design, Randomized Complete Block Design); The statistical packages Minitab and SPSS will be used for measure of location, measure of dispersion, graphical presentation, regression and correlation analysis; Test of significance of means, proportion, difference between two means, Proportions, CR Design and RCB Design.

Recommended Books:

  1. Zar, J. H. Biostatistical Analysis. 2003. 4th Edition, Pearson Education (Singapore) Prentice Hall International (UK) Limited. London, UK.
  2. Muhammad F. Statistical Methods and Data Analysis. 2000. Kitab Markaz, Bhawana Bazar Faisalabad, Pakistan.
  3. Choudhry, M. R. Modern Statistics (Vol-I & II ) 2001. Polymer Publications, Urdu Bazaar, Lahore.
  4. Steel R. G. D, Torrie J. H. and Dickey D. A Principles and Procedures of Statistics. A Biometrical Approach. 1997. 3rd edition. WCB Mc. Graw Hill, New York.

MPCN -104 - Laboratory Techniques in Human Nutrition - 3 (2+1*)

Theory:

Sampling and preparation for analysis. Proximate analysis for moisture, ash, silica, ether extract, crude protein and the use of micro- kjeldahl distillation apparatus. Crude fiber and nitrogen free extract. Determination of calcium, phosphorous, iron, vitamin A and Vitamin C. Qualitative examination of milk. Determination of total solids and ash. Determination of density and freezing point of milk. Determination of tritrable acidity. The protein, lactose and chlorides of milk. Chromatographic analysis. Circular chromatography, ascending single dimensional chromatography, descending single dimensional chromatography and two dimensional chromatography.

Practical

Quantitative examination of blood. Determination of glucose, cholesterol, hemoglobin, iron and plasma proteins in blood. Urine, analysis. Detection of sugar, albumen, ketones, bile salts, total nitrogen, urea, creatinine and sulphur in the urine.

Books Recommended:

  1. Hawk P. B. , B. L Oser and H. W. Sumerson 1967. Practical physiological Chemistry. (14th Ed) McGraw Hill Book co. New York.
  2. Keinneth. H. 1990. Official Methods of analysis of the Association of analytical Chemistry. AOAC. Inc. Virginia. USA.
  3. Meyer, H. L. 1987. Food Chemistry CBS Publisher and Distributors Delhi.
  4. Murry, R. K. , D. K Grammer, P. A. Mayer and V. W. Rodwell. 1993. Biochemistry. (22nd Ed). Print ice Hall, U. K.

MPCN -205 - Maternal and Pediatric Nutrition - 2 (2+0*)

Theory:

Food habits and nutrition intervention programs in relation to female life cycle. Nutritional requirements within the context of normal human development from pre-conception to adolescence. The mechanisms by which human cells and organs control nutrient metabolism. Emphasis is on nutritional concerns and recommended dietary practices during pregnancy, lactation and early childhood. The dietary management of common childhood concerns and adolescent eating disorders.

Books Recommended:

  1. Bozetti, F. and Staun, M. 2008. Home Parental Nutrition. CBI Publishing Co. pp. 352.

SCHEME OF STUDIES

Doctor Of Clinical Nutrition (5 Years)

Five Years (10 Semesters) Graduation Programme " Doctor of Clinical Nutrition Effective from Academic Session 2015 (Autumn) and onwards

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
ENG-100  English I (Functional English)  3(3+0*)
ISL-101  Islamic Studies / Ethics  2(2+0*)
CS-102  Introduction To Computer  3(3+0*)
DCN-103  Fundamentals of Human Nutrition  3(3+0*)
DCN-104  Introduction to Human Anatomy  4(2+2*)
DCN-105  Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals  3(3+0*)
 Sub. Total  18

SECOND SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
ENG-200  English II (Communication skills)  3(3+0*)
PAK-201  Pakistan Studies  2(2+0*)
DCN-202  Fundamentals of Microbiology  3(2+1*)
DCN-203  Dietetics-I  3(2+1*)
DCN-204  Physiology- 1  4(3+1*)
DCN-205  Fundamentals of Food Processing and Preservation  3(2+1*)
 Sub. Total  18

2nd Year - THIRD SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
ENG-300  English III (Technical & Report writing)  3(3+0*)
MAT-301  Mathematics  3(3+0*)
DCN-302  Macronutrients in Human Nutrition  3(3+0*)
DCN-303  Physiology- 2  4(3+1*)
DCN-304  Biochemistry-I  3(2+1*)
DCN-305  Biostatistics  3(3+0*)
 Sub. Total  19

FOURTH SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
ENG-400  English IV (Advanced academic R&W)  3(3+0*)
DCN-401  Vitamins in Human Nutrition  3(2+1*)
DCN-402  Minerals in Human Nutrition  3(2+1*)
DCN-403  Medical Microbiology  4(3+1*)
DCN-404  Meal Planning and Management  3(2+1*)
DCN-405  General Pathology  3(2+1*)
 Sub. Total  19

3rd Year - FIFTH SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-501  Nutrition Throughout Lifecycle  3(3+0*)
DCN-502  Disease Prevention Through Nutrition  3(2+1*)
DCN-503  Biochemistry-II  3(2+1*)
DCN-504  Epidemiology & Public Health  3(2+1*)
DCN-505  Systemic Pathology  3(2+1*)
DCN-506  Food Microbiology  3(2+1*)
 Sub. Total  18

SIXTH SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-601  Food Safety and Quality Management  3(2+1*)
DCN-602  Proteomics and Nutrigenomics  3(2+1*)
DCN-603  Introduction to Sociology  3(3+0*)
DCN-604  Public Health Nutrition  3(2+1*)
DCN-605  Dietetics-2  3(2+1*)
DCN-606  Nutrition and Psychology  2(2+0*)
 Sub. Total  17

4th Year - SEVENTH SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-701  Research Planning and Methods in Human Nutrition  3(3+0*)
DCN-702  Food Toxicology and Additives  3(2+1*)
DCN-703  Traditional and Aboriginal Foods  3(2+1*)
DCN-704  Biotechnology in Nutrition and Dietetics  3(2+1*)
DCN-705  Dietetics-3  3(2+1*)
DCN-706  Drug-Nutrient Interactions  2(2+0*)
 Sub. Total  17

EIGHTH SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-801  Community Project  3(0+3*)
DCN-802  Food and Drug Laws  2(2+0*)
DCN-803  Recent Advances in Clinical Nutrition  2(2+0*)
DCN-804  Nutritional Intervention Planning  3(2+1*)
DCN-805  Nutritional Education and Awareness  3(2+1*)
DCN-806  Sports Nutrition  3(2+1*)
 Sub. Total  16

5th Year - NINTH SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-901  Clinical Nutritional Management Placement-I  12(0+12*)
DCN-902  Research Project  3(0+3*)
 Sub. Total  15

TENTH SEMESTER

Course No.  Title of Course  Credit Hours
DCN-10101  Clinical Nutritional Management Placement-II  12(0+12*)
DCN-10102  Global Issues in Human Nutrition  3(3+0*)
 Sub. Total  15
 Total Credit Hours  172

NOTE:

  • The symbol indicates credit hours for the practicals

DCN-103 - Fundamentals of Human Nutrition - 3(3+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of fundamental concepts related to nutrition in everyday life.
  2. Explain nutritional terms, nutrients, their actions, interactions and balance in relation to human health.
  3. Understand the history of nutrition science and the new emerging challenges globally.

Theory:

An overview of food and nutrition; Food constituents, water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, fat and water soluble vitamins, major inorganic nutrients and other constituents, their dietary sources and importance in human nutrition; Introduction to human digestive system, digestion, absorption and transportation of nutrients in the system; Metabolism, transformation and interaction; Macro and micro-nutrients; Dietary sources of these nutrients, energy balance and body composition; Diet and health; Consumers concern about food and health; Nutrition assessment; Recommended dietary allowances for nutrients; Current concepts in nutrition; Food choices and human health; Food group plans and exchange systems used to assess food intakes; Nutrition related disorders and their management.

Recommended books:

  1. Whitney E. N. and Rolfes S. R. 2008. Understanding Nutrition, Thomson Higher Education.
  2. Wardlaw G. M. and Kessel M. W. 2002. Perspectives in Nutrition, McGrawHill.
  3. Awan J. A. 2000. Elements of Food and Nutrition. Preston University, Pakistan

DCN-104 Introduction to Human Anatomy 2(2+2*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. Anatomy of different body cells, tissues and organs like blood, heart, skin, etc.
  2. Functions of different body parts and their role to maintain body functions.
  3. Practical knowledge of human anatomy

Theory:

Introduction to anatomical terminologies, definitions like cell, tissue, organ system, etc.; Cardiovescular system; Heart, its structure, location of heart, blood supply to heart; Blood vessels, main blood vessels arising and entering the heart, types of blood vessels with examples; Basic tissues, epthelium, supporting/connective tissue, muscular tissue, nervous tissue and gastrointestinal tract (classification, shape, distribution and functions); Respiratory system, elementary system, urinary system, names and structures of their different parts and their relationship; Pituitary gland, structure, and relation to hypothalamus; Thyroid gland, structure; Adrenal gland, structure; Nervous system, introduction, cells of nervous system (Neuron), accessory cells of NS organization of Nervous system; Central nervous System, Brain+++++ Meninges (Cerebrum, Cerebral lobes, Ventricals, Cerebellum, Anatomy of Cerebellum, Brain stem, Mid+Brain, Pons, Medulla oblongata, Diencephlon, Thalamus, Hypothalamus, Cranial nerves, Spinal Cors+++ menges; CSF Internal structure; Sensory and Motor Pathway; Spinal Reflexes; Peripheral spinal nerves); Autonomic Nervous System, sympathetic nervous system and Parasympathetic System.

Recommended books:

  1. Romanes G. J., 1996. Cunningham's Manual of practical Anatomy. 3rd volume. Humphary Kalfom, Oxford, Oxford University Press, London.
  2. Gray H. 1996. Anatomy, Descriptive and Applied. Longman's Green and Co, London.
  3. Cormack H. D. 1993. Essential Histology, J B Lippincott Co Philadelphia.

DCN- 105 Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals 3(3+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have knowledge of;

  1. Functional foods, their importance and active ingredients involved
  2. Formulations of functional foods and mode of actions

Theory:

Introduction to functional foods, definition, importance, history and potential for the future; Important functional foods, dietary fiber, prebiotics and probiotics, bioactive compounds; Production and characterization of pre and probiotics, mechanism of actions, importance in gut management, criteria to be a pre and probiotic; Identification and characterization of bioactive components in foods; Scientific / epidemiological studies showing importance of prebiotics, probiotics and bioactive compounds to prevent diseases, bone and oral health, obesity, gut health, immune functions and cancer; Delivery of functional ingredients in enriched foods, issues of formulations, product development, encapsulation or slow release of protected components; Consumer acceptance and perceptions; Toxicological aspects of functional foods; Role of functional foods with an emphasis on the unique regulatory environment; Safety and efficacy of functional foods and regulatory issues that influence the development and commercialization in global market; Understanding rapidly changing market place for nutraceutical and functional food products; Complex regulatory environment for nutraceutical and functional food products; Interpreting health claims information and regulating requirements for labeling; Functional foods in international market and growth in Pakistan.

Recommended books:

  1. Hasler C. M. 2005. Regulation of Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals: A Global Perspective. Willey+Blackwell State Avenue, Ames, Iowa 50014, USA.
  2. Jim S. and Charter E. (editors) 2010. Functional Food Product Development. Blackwell publishers
  3. Robert E. C. W. 2007. Handbook of Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods. CRC/Taylor & Francis

DCN-202 Fundamentals of Microbiology 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The basics of microorganisms, their growth characteristics and requirements
  2. The instruments and lab techniques used in microbiology

Theory:

Introduction to microbiology, scope, definition, branches and applied areas of microbiology; Historical development of microbiology; Diversity of microbes; Differentiation between Prokaryotes and eukaryotes; An outline of the principles and applications bright field, dark field, phase contrast, fluorescent and electron microscope; Morphology, arrangement and detailed anatomy of bacterial cell; Ultra+structure of bacteria; Microbial growth and requirements, physico-chemical requirements, pH, temperature, oxidation reduction potential, gaseous and nutritional requirements; Microbial multiplication and growth curves; General methods of studying microorganisms, cultivation, isolation, purification and characterization; Microbial culture systems, microbial preservation; Control of microorganisms by physical and chemical methods; Chemotherapeutic agents and antibiotics, modes of action of antibiotics on microorganisms, antibiotic resistance; A brief introduction to structure and propagation of fungi, protozoa, algae viruses and bacteriophages.

Practical:

Safety in the microbiological laboratory; Contaminations and decontamination; Demonstration of laboratory equipments, their basic functions and handling; Practical demonstration of Microscopy; Sterilization and disinfection; Physical agents including moist heat, dry heat, ionizing radiation, filtration, etc.; Chemical agents, antiseptics and disinfectants, evaluation of antimicrobial activity (phenol coefficient); Preparation and sterilization of bacteriological media; preparation and demonstration of various culture media; (basic, enriched, selective, differential, transport and storage media); Stains and staining, principles of staining procedures, simple (Loeffler's methylene blue) staining, differential (Gram's and acid fast), special (capsule, spores, etc.); Methods of bacterial cultivation and growth, Bacterial colonies, Types and characteristics. Bacterial morphology: Shape, arrangement and micrometry

Recommended Books:

  1. Tortora G. J., B.R. Funke and C.L. Case. Microbiology+ An. Introduction. 2004. 8th Ed. Pearson Edu. Inc., California, U.S.A
  2. Alcamo I. E. Fundamentals of Microbiology. 2001. Jones and Bartlett Pub., USA.
  3. Cappuccino J. G. and N. Sherman Microbiology: a laboratory manual. 2004. Pearson Education, USA.
  4. Talaro K. P. and A. Talaro. Foundation in Microbiology. 2002. McGraw Hill. N.York.

DCN - 203 Dietetics-1 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Explain the role of a dietitian in disease management and prevention.
  2. Understand the importance and application of diet therapy in relation to health and disease.
  3. Demonstrate and conduct a complete nutritional assessment.
  4. Develop skills in formulating therapeutic diets.
  5. Identify and explain the principles and types of counseling techniques and role of a nutritional counselor in a clinical setup.

Theory:

Dietetics, history and importance; Role of a dietitian in clinical practice, responsibilities of a clinical dietitian; Food composition tables, balanced diet, food guide pyramid; Energy metabolism, components of energy expenditure, basal metabolic rate, total energy expenditure, measurement of energy expenditure; Estimated energy requirements; Body mass index, dietary guidelines, dietary reference intake; Recommended dietary allowances; Nutritional status, nutritional screening, nutritional imbalance; Assessment of nutritional status; Anthropometry, biochemical studies, clinical data, dietary history; Diet according to different groups; Energy value of different foods, carbohydrates, fats, proteins; Normal and therapeutic diets; Role of diet in disease conditions; Exchange system and menu planning. Nutritional counseling and clinical practices, the people involved in counseling; Counseling child, adult and family, counseling the adult learner; Counseling skills for behavior change.

Practical:

Interpretation of food guide pyramid, food groups, food composition tables, performing anthropometry, calculating energy requirements, interpretation of BMI, dietary history, clinical findings.

Recommended books:

  1. Mahan, L. K. and Escott+Stump S. 2008. Krause's Food & Nutrition Therapy, Elsevier Saunders.
  2. Nelms M., Sucher K. 2010. Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology, Cengage Learning.
  3. Whitney E. N. and Rolfes S. R. 2008. Understanding Nutrition, Thomson Higher Education.
  4. Wardlaw G. M. and Kessel M. W. 2002. Perspectives in nutrition, McGraw+Hill.
  5. King K. and Helm K. K. 2007. Nutrition Therapy: Advanced Counseling Skills, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

DCN-204 Physiology - 1 4(3+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The basic principles in human physiology
  2. The function & regulation of the human body and physiological integration of the organ systems to maintain homeostasis

Theory:

Introduction to human physiology and its applications; Cellular physiology, homeostasis and homeostatic mechanisms; Levels of organization in the body; General properties of the living cell and the internal environment; Cell organelles, their properties and functions; Tissues and organs; Membranes, classification of membrane transport systems - passive and active; Body fluids - blood, lymph, cerebrospinal fluid and synovial fluid; Metabolism and reproduction; Introduction to various human body systems like neural, muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine systems and environmental physiology.

Practical:

Microscopic analysis of different kinds of cells and their organelles; membranes and transport systems; visual and graphical presentation of different human systems; Identification of slides having different tissues and cells.

Recommended Books:

  1. Widmaier, Raff, & Strang. Vander's Human Physiology: The Mechanisms of Body Function, 12th edition, McGraw Hill, 2008. ISBN 978+0+07+337810+7
  2. McArdle, Katch & Katch, edition, Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and Human Performance, seven edition, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010. ISBN 978+0+7817+9781+8

DCN-205 Fundamentals of Food Processing and Preservation 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The principles of food spoilage and the causative agents responsible for this deterioration
  2. Basic principles and techniques for the preservation of food and food items of various sources

Theory:

Introduction to principles of food preservation and causes of food spoilage; Enzymes, microbes, insects and pests, spoilage during food handling; Preparatory operations in food processing, cleaning, sorting and grading, peeling, washing, etc.; Use of heat treatment, canning, pasteurization, sterilization, blanching; Effect of heat treatment on nutritional value of food; Utilization of low temperature, cooling, freezing, freeze burn; Removal of moisture, drying, dehydration; Use of chemical additives, preservatives and non+preservatives; Food irradiation, their types, applications, effect of irradiation on foods, advantages and disadvantages; Fermentation, types of fermentation, applications in the food industry; Food bio+preservation, principles and mode of actions; Food packaging, characteristics of a food packaging material, types of packaging material and their advantages and disadvantages.

Practical:

Identification of factors causing food spoilage, Causative agents. Preservation of fruits by making jams, jellies and marmalades. Application of heat for moisture removal.

Recommended books:

  1. Awan, J. A. 2007. Food Processing and Preservation, Unitech communications, Faisalabad - Pakistan.
  2. Potter N. N. 2006. Food Science. 5th edition, Springer NY. USA
  3. Zeuthen P. 2003. Food Preservation Techniques. Woodhead publishing, CRC Press, England

DCN-302 Macronutrients in Human Nutrition 3(3+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The basic chemistry, food sources and their fate in human digestive system
  2. The metabolic disorders caused by these nutrients

Theory:

Introduction to biochemistry of proteins, structural features, characteristics, functions; Amino acids (biosynthesis and degradation); Food sources (on the basis of their functions in human body); Digestion and absorption; Metabolic fates of amino acids (deamination, transamination); Urea cycle; Ketogenic amino acids; Glucogenic amino acids; Protein metabolism in liver & kidney diseases; Protein energy malnutrition; Nature of CHO; Structure of carbohydrates; Classification and functions of carbohydrates - Monosaccharaides, Disaccharides, Oligosaccharides, Polysaccharaides; Digestion and absorption of carbohydrates; Glycolitic pathway; Glycolysis, Glycogenesis, Glycogen catabolism; Tricarboxylic acid cycle and pentose phosphate pathway; Biosynthesis of carbohydrates; Gluconeogenesis; Regulation of carbohydrate metabolism pathways; CHO+ metabolism in diabetes;Nature and classification of lipids + Fatty acids (saturated, unsaturated, polysaturated), glycerol, cholesterol, sterol; lipoprotein systems (blood lipids); Fats biosynthesis (lipids, phospholipids and sphingolipids); Lipid biosynthesis (cholestrol, sterol); Lipid oxidation; Essential fatty acids (sources & health benefits); Adipose tissues; Digestion, absorption, metabolism and transportation of lipids; Oxidation of fatty acids (beta oxidation); Ketone bodies; Nutritional disorders of lipids

Recommended Books:

  1. David L. N., Lehninger A. L. and Michael M. C. 2008. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. W. H. Freeman & Company
  2. Wardlaw G. M. and Kessel M. W. 2002. Perspectives in Nutrition, McGraw+Hill.

DCN-303 Physiology - 2 4(3+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The in-depth presentation of the function of the major organs and organ systems of the human body

Theory:

General introduction to various human body systems and their importance; Digestive physiology+ basic functional anatomy of digestive system, GIT secretions and their functions, Accessory organs of the digestive tract, pancreas, liver and gall bladder, large intestines and associated structures, digestive processes occurring in large intestines, mechanism of absorption, secretions and formation of faeces; Respiratory physiology - organs involved and their role; Blood circulation system - organs involved, heart, arteries, veins, etc. and lymphatic system, absorption of nutrients in these systems; Reproductive and urinary systems in detail; Skeletal system

Practical:

Composition of body fluids like blood, urine, etc.; Identification of diseases of different systems

Recommended Books:

  1. Widmaier, Raff, & Strang. Vander's Human Physiology: The Mechanisms of Body Function, 12th edition, McGraw Hill, 2008. ISBN 978+0+07+337810+7
  2. McArdle, Katch & Katch, edition, Exercise Physiology: Nutrition, Energy, and Human Performance, seven edition, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010. ISBN 978+0+7817+9781+8

DCN-304 Biochemistry-I 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The basic chemistry of major macronutrients in human nutrition
  2. The basic terminologies, principles and mechanisms in proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes and nucleic acid

Theory:

Introduction, scope and importance of biochemistry in life sciences; Brief introduction of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; General phenomena, law of mass action, dissociation of water and pH value, buffer, transportation mechanisms across bio+membranes and osmosis; Enzymes, nature and functions, characteristics, mode of action, factors affecting enzymes activity, specificity and inhibition, isozymes, ribozymes, coenzymes and prosthetic groups, vitamins as coenzymes; Regulatory enzymes, classification and nomenclature of enzymes; Carbohydrates, introduction to carbohydrates, metabolism of carbohydrates, glycolysis, Kerbs cycle, pentose phosphate shunt; proteins, classification of proteins, biochemical functions, amino acids, structure, classification and acid base behavior of amino acids, peptide linkage and polypeptides; Primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins; Hydrolysis of protein and reactions of amino acids; Lipids; occurrence and functions, classification of lipids, triacylglycerol, waxes, phospholipids, sphingolipids and sterols; Structure, characteristics and classification of fatty acids and triglycerides; Metabolism of fats, β+oxidation of fatty acids and its energy yield; Nucleic acids, chemistry of nucleotides, Central dogma of molecular biology, replication, transcription and translation.

Practical:

Preparation of different buffers and their pH adjustment; Determination of macronutrients (protein, CHO, lipids) in different foods; Activity of different enzymes like amylase in saliva.

Recommended Books:

  1. Ahmad, Mushtaq. 2003. Essential of medical biochemistry, Vol 1, 7th Ed. Ilmi book house, Urdu bazar, Lahore.
  2. Berg, J. M., J. L. Tymoczko and L. Stryer. 2007. Biochemistry, 6th Ed. W.H. Freeman and Company. New York.
  3. Nelson, D. L and M. M. Cox. 2005. Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry. 4th ed. Worth Publisher, New York.

DCN-305 Biostatistics 3(3+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Understand the basic concepts and experimental designs in statistics
  2. Organize the experimental data and to analyze it through different software

Theory:

Introduction of statistics; Types of data (scales of measurements), Frequency distribution for continuous and discrete data; Visual representation of data, stem and leaf display, box and whisker plots; Measures of location and variability, moments, skewness, coefficient of skewness and kurtosis; Definitions and laws of probability; Simple correlation and regression analysis; Elementary ideas of sampling, distribution of means and proportions; Test of significance of means, proportion, difference between means and difference between proportions with their confidence intervals; Experimental design (Completely Randomized Design, Randomized Complete Block Design); The statistical packages Minitab and SPSS will be used for measure of location, measure of dispersion, graphical presentation, regression and correlation analysis; Test of significance of means, proportion, difference between two means, Proportions, CR Design and RCB Design.

Recommended Books:

  1. Zar, J. H. Biostatistical Analysis. 2003. 4th Edition, Pearson Education (Singapore) Prentice Hall International (UK) Limited. London, UK.
  2. Muhammad F. Statistical Methods and Data Analysis. 2000. Kitab Markaz, Bhawana Bazar Faisalabad, Pakistan.
  3. Choudhry, M. R. Modern Statistics (Vol+I & II ) 2001. Polymer Publications, Urdu Bazaar, Lahore.
  4. Steel R. G. D, Torrie J. H. and Dickey D.A Principles and Procedures of Statistics. A Biometrical Approach. 1997. 3rd edition. WCB Mc. Graw Hill, New York, USA.

DCN-401 Vitamins in Human Nutrition 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Describe different types of vitamins on the basis of their chemical properties and significant functions in human body
  2. Explain the role of individual vitamins in metabolism and regulation of body's homeostasis
  3. Describe and identify the deficiency diseases related to each vitamin

Theory:

Introduction to vitamins, importance and role in human nutrition; Categories of vitamins, fat and water soluble vitamins; Fat soluble vitamins, vitamin A, D, E and K; General properties, dietary sources, biochemical and physical functions and mechanisms in the body, their deficiency syndromes, recommended intake; Digestion, absorption, metabolism and storage for each vitamin; Water soluble vitamins, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, biotin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, ascorbic acid; General properties, food sources, recommended daily allowances, FAO/WHO standards, deficiency disorders; Digestion, absorption, metabolism and storage of these vitamins separately; Toxicity caused by excess of vitamins; Losses of vitamin during food processing; Vitamin like compounds.

Practical:

Identification of patients having different vitamin deficiencies; Estimation of vitamins in blood serum; Diagnostic tools for individual vitamin deficiency diseases (physical and biochemical parameters)

Recommended books:

  1. Gordon M. W. and Hampl J. S. 2007. Perspective in Nutrition, McGraw+Hill Publishing Company Limited, New York, USA.
  2. Sareen S. G., Jack L. S., and James L. G. 2009. Advanced Nutrition and Human Metabolism, 5th edition, Wadsworth Cengage Learning, USA.
  3. Lindsay A., Benoist B+de., Dary O. and Hurrell R. (editors). 2006. Guidelines on Food Fortification with Micronutrients. Copy writes, FAO / WHO

DCN-402 Minerals in Human Nutrition 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Describe different types of minerals on the basis of their chemical properties and significant functions in human body
  2. Explain the role of individual mineral in metabolism and regulation of body's homeostasis
  3. Describe and identify the deficiency diseases related to each mineral

Theory:

Introduction to minerals, importance of minerals in normal nutrition; Macrominerals, calcium, chloride, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium, sodium, sulfur, their dietary sources, digestion, absorption and storage for each mineral; Recommended daily allowances; Selected enzyme cofactors, deficiency symptoms and disorders; Microminerals, iron, zinc, copper, selenium etc. food sources, RDA, deficiency disorders; Digestion, absorption, metabolism and storage of these microminerals separately in detail; Toxicity or problems caused by excess of minerals; Minerals in processed foods; Minerals and hypertension, health related issues of minerals.

Practical:

Identification of patients having different mineral deficiencies; Mineral determination in serum; Iron deficiency anemia/ hemoglobin; Determination of bone mineral density.

Recommended books:

  1. Allin L., Benoist B. de, Dary O. and Hurrell R. (editors) 2006. Guidelines on Food Fortification with Micronutrients. FAO/WHO
  2. Gordon M. W. and Hampl J. S. 2007. Perspective in Nutrition, McGraw+Hill Publishing Company Limited, New York, USA.
  3. Robert, A. D. 2005. Handbook of Minerals as Nutritional Supplements. CRC Press.

DCN-403 Medical Microbiology 4(3+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The basics of diseases, their diagnosis and practical applications
  2. The important bacteria, virus and protozoa and their diseases

Theory:

Introduction to identification techniques in Medical Microbiology; Host+parasite interactions; Basic concepts of epidemiology; Microbial virulence, factors responsible; Determinants of pathogenicity and molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis; Study of etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, immunology; Lab. diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control of the following microbes and parasites of human importance:

  1. Bacteria: Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Niesseria, Pseudomonas, Corynebacterium, Bordetella, Vibrio, Clostridium, Bacillus, Campylobacter, Aeromonas, Helicobacter, Legionella, Mycobacterium, Actinomycetes / Nocardia, Chlamydia and Mycoplasma etc.
  2. Virus: Influenzavirus, Lyssavirus, Virus of Hepatitis, Human deficiency virus and AIDS virus etc.
  3. Protozoa: Blood Protozoa, Protozoa causing digestive tract infections, Protozoa causing respiratory tract infections, Protozoa causing genital tract infections etc.

Practical:

Collection and transportation of clinical samples, infections of ENT, GIT, urogenintal tract and bone; Isolation and identification of selected pathogens; Antibiotic assays by disc diffusion methods and dilution method; Aggltination test; Precipitation tests; Sero+diagnostic tests; Microscopic study of Leishmania, Entamoeba, Plasmodium and Giardia.

Recommended Books:

  1. Levinson W. E. and E. Jawetz. Medical Microbiology and Immunology. 2000. McGraw Hill Book Co., New York.
  2. Murray P. R., K.S. Rosenthal, G. S. Kobayashi and M. A. Pfaller. Medical Microbiology. 2001. Mosby+Year Book, Inc.
  3. Patrick R, K.S. Murray, G.S. Rosenthal and M.A.P. Kobayashi. Medical Microbiology. 2002. Mosby, USA.

DCN-404 Meal Planning and Management 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Identify the importance of meal planning and its role in everyday life.
  2. Apply the principles of meal planning in the planning of balanced and appropriate meals keeping in mind the nutritional requirements, family budget and food choices of different age groups.
  3. Identify market trends and conditions while purchasing food keeping in mind food costs and quality.

Theory:

Importance and principles of meal planning for family and occasions; Nutritional value of meal, family meal budgeting; Rules for good menu planning, menu planning for families; Selection of various foods, meat, poultry, cereals, fish, eggs, fruits and vegetables in relation to season and market conditions; Selection, use and care of table appointments; Study of different types of table settings, table manners and etiquettes.

Practical:

Survey and record keeping of market prices (retail & wholesale); Comparison of weight, volume and effect of cooking on colour, taste and texture of different foods; Planning, preparation and service of meals for different occasions at different income levels; Market visits for cost and quality and food marketing regulations.

Recommended books:

  1. Whitney E. and Rolfes S. 2005. Understanding Nutrition, Wadsworth.
  2. Wardlaw G. M. and Kessel M. W. 2002. Perspectives in Nutrition, McGraw+Hill.
  3. Bogert D. J. 2001. Nutrition and Physical Fitness, W.B. Saunders Co. Philadelphia, London.

DCN-405 General Pathology 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The basic terminologies in different pathological states
  2. Cell injuries, necrosis and their types
  3. Practical applications of pathology

Theory:

Scope of pathology and concept of diseases; Definition and terminology: Ischemia, Hypoxia, Necrosis, Infarction, Atrophy, Hypertrophy, Hyperplasia, Metaplasia, Plasia, Anaplasia; Response of body to injury and infection; Acute Inflammation, Chronic inflammation, Immunity, Allergy, Hypersensitivity; Specific, Ulcer (Peptic, Duodenal), Hypertension, Leukemia or Blood Cancer (Malignant Carcinoma, Sarcoma & Lymphomas); Diagnosis and treatment of Cancer in general, fate, survival and prognosis with tumors.

Practical:

Study of Pathological Slides of various Pathological Conditions, Acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, chronic specific inflammation; Different types of Degeneration, Thrombosis, Embolism, Infarction, Necrosis, Gangrene, Hyperplasia, Metaplasia, Pigmentation, Calcification, CVC, Papilloma, Adenoma, Chondroma, Fibroma, Leomyoma, Neofibroma, Sq. Cell Carcinoma, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Transitional Cell Carcinoma, Adenocarcinoma, Fibrocarcinoma, Rhadomyosarcoma, Leomyosarcoma, Lymphosarcoma, Liposarcoma, Reticular Cell Sarcoma, Hodgkins disease, Breast Carcinoma, Osteogenic Sarcoma, Osteoclastoma.

Recommended Books:

  1. Kumar Cotran Robins, Basic Pathology, 6th Ed., W B Saunders Company, Philadelphia (1992)
  2. Walters and Israel, General Pathology, Churchill Livingstone, London (1998).
  3. Peter S Macfarlane, Robin Reid, Robin Collander, Pathology Illustrated, Churchill Livingstone, London (1998).
  4. Walter G B, General Pathology, Churchill Livingstone, New York, 1996.

DCN-501 Nutrition throughout Life Cycle 3(3+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Understand different physiological stages of human life with specific nutritional requirements
  2. Describe increased requirements during pregnancy and lactation
  3. Understand the relationship between nutrient needs and growth and development of children
  4. Understand nutrition related problems in elderly and their management.

Theory:

Nutrition during pregnancy and lactation; Recommendations for women before pregnancy; Risk factors for prenatal nutrition and its indicators for referral, weight gain and pregnancy; Dietary requirement for pregnant and lactating mothers, behavior change tool, nutritional risk assessment tools, complications that may affect nutritional status, postpartum weight loss; Nutritional goals for infants (premature and full term), growth and nutritional requirement, feeding the premature infants with special consideration; Nutrition for healthy children and adolescents aged 2+18 years, growth, energy and nutrient needs; Use of food guide pyramid, childhood obesity, low fat diets, Neophobia; Feeding toddlers and pre+schools, feeding school age and adolescents; Youth risk behaviors and surveillance, group feeding; Nutrition for adults, dietary guidelines, food pyramid, food labels, American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute guidelines; Nutritional counseling for adults, energy requirement; Nutrition concerns for elderly, demographic of aging, nutritional assessment, diet, lifestyle, morbidity and mortality, risk factors for poor nutritional status; Hunger and food security, under nutrition, poor appetite, weight loss, obesity, overweight and chronic diseases; Nutritional requirement and intake; Supplements, vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium and antioxidants, caution about dietary supplements.

Books Recommended:

  1. Walter W. 1998. Nutritional Epidemiology. 2nd edition. Oxford University Press, USA.
  2. Judith S. and Edelstein S. 2011. Essentials of Life Cycle Nutrition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, UK.

DCN-502 Disease Prevention through Nutrition 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Explain types and etiology of major nutritional disorders.
  2. Identify critical nutrients related to various diseases or conditions.
  3. Understand disease prevention guidelines for the major chronic diseases.
  4. Explain role of diet in the prevention of major nutritional disorders.

Theory:

Relation of diet and food to health and disease; Overview of nutrition in health and prevention; Influence of socioeconomic, cultural, and psychological factors on food and nutrition behavior; Dietary requirements of micro+ and macronutrients in the prevention of toxicity or deficiency syndromes and chronic disease; Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), e.g. herbs, vitamins and supplements; Food guide pyramid; Health eating index; Exchange system; Food composition tables; National guidelines; Nutrition in prevention (Cancer, Bone Disease, Anemia, Hypertension, Metabolic Syndrome, Heart Disease, Allergies, Weight Management, Eating Disorders); Integrative medicine (Herbals, Phytotherapy).

Practical:

Usage of computer based nutrient analysis and food composition tables in the calculation of various diets and menus to determine nutrient adequacy; Utilization of nutrition assessment data to determine health; Nutrition screening and assessment; Assessment of energy expenditure and requirements

Books Recommended:

  1. Mahan K, Escott+Stump S. 2008. Krause's Food, Nutrition, & Diet Therapy. 12th Edition. Saunders/Elsevier.
  2. Nix S. 2009. Williams' Basic Nutrition & Diet Therapy, 13th edition, Mosby, . ISBN: 9780323051996

DCN-503 Biochemistry -II 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Understand the biochemistry involved in different human diseases and their effect on metabolism

Theory:

Structure, functions and disorder of digestive system, lungs, muscles, connective tissues, kidney, heart and membranes; Dynamic state of metabolism, metabolic interrelation of tissues (Liver, muscles and adipose tissues); Requirement and adjustment of availability, nitrogen economy; Heritable and acquired diseases; Biochemistry of diseases like malaria, typhoid, arthritis, hepatitis, diabetes, cancer, acquired immunity deficiency syndrome (AIDS), tuberculosis, heart diseases (atherosclerosis) etc; Effect of diseases on metabolism and physiological functions.

Practical:

Protein analysis in different samples like urea, blood, etc.; Glycemic index of different foods and determination of blood glucose in diabetic patients; Complete blood profile

Recommended Books:

  1. Baynes, J. and M. Dominiczak. 1999. Medical Biochemistry. 1st Edition. Mosby, London.
  2. Devlin, T.M. 2005. Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlation. 6th ed. Wiley+Liss, Inc.
  3. Kent, T. H and M. N. Hart. 1998. Introduction to Human Disease. 4th ed. Appleton and Lange. Stamford.
  4. Meisenberg, G. and W. H. Simmons. 1998. Principles of Medical Biochemistry. Harcourt Brace and Company Ltd.

DCN -504 Epidemiology & Public Health 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The basic principles of disease spread and public health
  2. Collection of data regarding different diseases of humans

Theory:

Introduction to epidemiology, types of epidemiology, clinical, occupational, experimental, interrelation of factors; Epidemiological methods, incidence, prevalence, rate, susceptibility etc.; Types of studies, cross sectional, cohort, case control; Epidemiologic consideration in disease process; Sampling methodology: procedure, sample size, cluster sampling, sampling error, bias, risk, data collection of infectious disease cases, antibiotic resistance profile of infectious agents; Screening tests, accuracy of screening tests, predictive value, reliability; Hypothesis testing, statistical significance, (p values, confidence interval etc); Disease pattern in community and Social diversity; Molecular epidemiology: bio+markers etc.; Health and productivity schemes: development of standards of health and productivity, surveillance and monitoring of disease; Applied epidemiology: rationale, strategies and concepts of control and eradication of diseases.

Practical:

Designing of questionnaire for disease surveillance; Village search for disease, storage, analysis, interpretation of data; Analysis and interpretation of passive surveillance data of Medical/Veterinary hospitals; Hands on training of computer software for epidemiology.

Recommended Books:

  1. Friedman G. D. Primer of Epidemiology. 1994. 4th Edi. McGraw+Hill Inc., Singapore.
  2. Robert H. F. and Thomas A. S. 2009. Epidemiology for Public Health Practice. 4th edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers.
  3. Ann A. and George R. S. III. 2008. Essentials of Epidemiology in Public Health. 2nd edition. Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

DCN-505 Systemic Pathology 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The basic knowledge of different human body systems and their disease
  2. Disease management of different systems of human body

Theory:

Introduction to systemic pathology, Gerenaral terms, Respiratory System: Atelactesis, emphysema, pneumonia, Developmental anomalies of heart Different types of pneumonia Pneumonic Manheniosis, CCPP,CBPP, Pleuritis, Canine distemper and other respiratory disorders, Cardiovascular System: Pericarditis, endocarditic, myocarditis Heart failure, arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis, Medial sclerosis, Digestive System: General consideration, Diseases of oral cavity, pharynx and oesophagus, Dysphagia, parasitic diseases of oesophagus, Diseases of stomach, developmental anomalies, Diseases of intestine (small, large)Liver and biliary system, Urinary System: General consideration, Renal failure, glomerulonephritis, Skeletal System: Bone formation, examination of skeleton, Developmental abnormalities, osteoporosis, Inflammatory bone diseases, arthritis, Male Reproductive System: General consideration, surgical conditions of prepuce, Metabolic bone disease, Balanopsthitis, orchitis, Female Reproductive System: Developmental abnormalities, metritis, endometritis, Developmental abnormalities, Pyometra, abortion, still birth and brucellosis, Haemopoietic System: Red blood cell disorder, anaemia, its types, White blood cell disorders, different diseases Caseous lymphadenitis and other lymph node associated disease, Neurodegenerative diseases, Muscular System: General reaction of muscles, atrophy, hypertrophy, Myelenopathies, inflammations, Listeriosis, hemophilus infection, Myotonic syndrome, metabolic myopathies, Viral infections, Parasitic infections, Endocrine System: Mechanism of endocrine diseases, Disorders of pituitary and adrenal, Disorders of thyroid and pancreas, Milk fever, postparturient hemoglobinurea, Skin and Appendages: General consideration, Dermatohistopathology, Perifolliculitis, folliculitis, furunculosis, Congenital and hereditary diseases, Viral disease, fungal and parasitic diseases

Practical:

Postmortem Examination to observe different body systems; Gross examination of lesions; Histopahological interpretation of different systemic diseases

Recommended Books:

  1. Underwood J. C. E. 2009. General and Systemic Pathology. Churchill Publisher
  2. Godwin, T. A. General and Systemic Pathology. 2001, Lippinncott William and Wilkins Publisher
  3. Mark Z., Elaine T., Jill R. and Paul H. Human Disease: A Systemic Approach. 2009 (7th Edition)

DCN -506 Food Microbiology 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The microorganisms involved in food especially dairy
  2. The techniques to reduce the load of microbes

Theory:

Scope and importance of food and dairy microbiology; Microorganisms (bacteria, molds, yeast and virus) important in food and dairy industries; Principles of food spoilage and their preservation, Spoilage and preservation of food products; Food hygiene: Milk and milk by-products hygiene: types of bacteria in milk, bacteriological grading of milk, infections (animal and human pathogens transmitted through milk) and intoxications associated with milk. Adulteration of milk; Measures to control the microbial growth in foods; Quality assurance in food industries. Methods of increasing safety of milk supply (pasteurization, sterilization (UHT) and preservation of milk); Quality control of dried milk. Infection and intoxication associated with cream, yoghurt and cheese. Defects and spoilage of cheese; Microbiology of food and food products, fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, shellfish and eggs/egg products; Residues of drugs and pesticides in milk, meat, fish, shellfish, eggs and their effect on human health; Recent advances in food industry; Technology of food processing and preservation; Microbiology of yogurt starter cultures; Preservation and production of starter culture; Quality control in yogurt and other fermented dairy products manufacture; Beneficial microorganisms and their use in food industry; Food spoilage and food poisoning.

Practical:

Collection, transportation and microbiological examination of milk, meat, eggs and egg products; Isolation and identification of the pathogenic organisms from experimentally contaminated eggs, meat, fish and milk samples; Qualitative and quantitative methods; most probable number (MPN) and Total plate count for coliform, Staphylococcus aureus and other pathogens; Enumeration of bacteria from Poultry, Beef, Milk, Eggs and Fish; Isolation of starter culture from Cheese and Yogurt; Isolation of phages from lactobacilli; Field Trips to Food industry and Dairy plant.

Recommended Books:

  1. Corry J. E., L.D. Roberts and F.A. Skinner. Isolation and Identification of Food Poisoning Organisms. 1992. Academic Press Inc., London.
  2. Jay J. M., M.J. Loessner and D.A.Golden. Modern Food Microbiology. 2006. Springer Science, Inc., USA.
  3. Frazer W. C. Food Microbiology. 1998. McGraw Hill Book Co., New York.

DCN- 601 Food Safety and Quality Management 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

After completing this course and completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to;

  1. Understand the basics of food quality and safety management and how it can be implemented in the industry to improve human health
  2. Analyze different hazards involved in food and their impact on consumer
  3. Know about different ISO systems and their food safety rules and regulations and current situation in Pakistan and its improvement

Theory:

Food safety, security and quality, definition and importance; Different terminologies used in food safety quality; Categories of physical hazards; Categories of chemical hazards; Categories of biological hazards; Good manufacturing practices; good storage practices; Plant design layout; Hazards Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP), Principals and its implementation; Quality Management System (ISO 9001:2008), Food Safety Management System (ISO 22000:2005), benefits, requirements and hurdles in their implementation; Food safety laws in Pakistan—West Pakistan Pure Foods Ordinance, 1960, Cantonments Pure Food Ordinance Act, 1966, West Pakistan Pure Food Rules 1965, The Punjab Pure Food Rules 2007 & 2011, , Pakistan Penel Code, Pakistan Hotels and Restaurants Act, 1976 Pakistan Standard and Quality Control Authority Act, 1996 (PSQCA) for food, PSQCA standards for food, Consumers Right Commission of Pakistan, Punjab Food Safety Authority;

Practical:

Hazard analysis+identification techniques (physical, chemical, biological); Risk assessment of process line+ control measures (specific and general); Techniques for establishing critical limits; Monitoring of critical process and product parameters, target values, action limits and values; Visit of food industry+ ISO 9001:2008, procedures preparation

Recommended books:

  1. David A. S. and Norah F.S. 1998. Principles and Practices for the Safe Processing of Foods. Woodhead Publishing Limited, Cambridge, England.
  2. FAO. 1998. Food Quality and Safety System. A Training Manual on food hygiene and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) System.

DCN-602 Proteomics and Nutri-genomics 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have understanding of;

  1. Proteomics and Nutri - genomics, their importance and role in management of chronic diseases.

Theory:

Introduction to MIC's, types and importance; Introduction to proteomics, genes, DNA, proteins synthesis; Protein chemistry and structure, 3D structure of protein and its importance; Applications of proeteomics, clinical, biotechnology and drug production, bioterrorism and future perspectives of proteomics; Introduction to different protein data banks and software involved to explore protein; Introduction to nutri+genomics; Nutrition and gene regulation, effect of carbohydrates, dietary fats and PUFA, protein and amino acids, minerals and vitamins; Role of nutrients in management of chronic diseases.

Practical:

Isolation and quantification of DNA and plasmid DNA; Introduction to gene expression and different expression systems; Different methods in protein purification; Effect of different chemicals and cations in bacterial gene expression; Introduction to PCR and genetic analyzer, genotyping, protein profiling.

Recommended Books:

  1. MineY., Kazuo M and Fereidoon S. 2009. Nutrigenomics and Proteomics in Health and Disease: Food factors and gene interactions. John Willey & Sons. New Jersey, USA
  2. Regina B+F and Joost H+G. 2006. Nutritional Genomics: Impact on health and disease. Wiley+VCH, Germany
  3. Nawin C.M. 2010. Introduction to Proteomics: Principles and Applications. John Willey & Sons. New Jersey, USA.

DCN-603 Introduction to Sociology 3(3+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to understand;

  1. The social setup and interaction in the community as nutritionists and dietitians

Theory:

  1. Introduction
  1. Definition, Scope, and Subject Matter
  2. Sociology as a science
  3. Historical back ground of Sociology
  4. Social Interaction
  1. Levels of Social Interaction
  1. Process of Social Interaction
  1. Cooperation
  2. Competition
  3. Conflict
  4. Accommodation
  5. Acculturation
  6. Assignment
  7. Amalgamation
  1. Social Groups
  1. Definition & functions
  2. Types of social groups
  1. In and out groups
  2. Primary and secondary groups
  3. Reference groups
  4. Informal and formal groups
  5. Pressure groups
  1. Culture
  1. Definition, aspects and characteristics of culture
  1. Material and non material culture
  2. Ideal and real culture
  1. Elements of culture
  1. Beliefs
  2. Values
  3. Norms and social sanctions
  1. Organizations of culture
  1. Traits
  2. Complexes
  3. Patterns
  4. Ethos
  5. Theme
  1. Other related concepts
  1. Cultural Relativism
  2. Sub cultures
  3. Ethnocentrism and Xenocentrism
  4. Cultural lag
  1. Socialization and personality
  1. Personality, factors in personality formation
  2. Socialization, agencies of socialization
  3. Role and status
  1. Characteristics of Pakistan society
  1. Social stratification, cast, class and ethnicity
  2. Social institutions in Pakistan
  1. Family
  2. Religion
  3. Economy
  4. Politics
  5. Education
  6. Recreational
  7. Rural society
  8. Urban society
  1. Environmental Anthropology
  1. Anthropology as a discipline
  2. Anthropological activities regarding environment
  3. Man and environment
  4. Types of environment
  5. Man effecting environment
  1. Major social problems

Recommended Books:

1. Giddens A. 2006. Sociology. 5th edition. Polity press, Cambridge, UK

2. John J. M. and Plummer K. 2008. Sociology: A Global Introduction. Pearson Prentice Hall

3. Khan F. R. 1966. Sociology of Pakistan. Shirin Publications

DCN-604 Public Health Nutrition-I 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to;

  1. Learn the core concepts in public health and understand how they have been and are currently applied to nutrition.
  2. Understand how health problems related to nutrition are assessed at the population level
  3. Explain the global public health issues with emphasis on our local scenario.

Theory:

History of medicine and birth of public health concept; Changing concepts in public health and foundations of public health nutrition, applying concept of health and disease; Concepts of control+disease control, disease elimination, disease eradication, monitoring and surveillance; Levels of prevention, modes of intervention; Principles of epidemiology and epidemiological methods+observational studies (Descriptive and analytical); Experimental or interventional studies (Randomized clinical trials, community intervention studies), concept of association and causation; Disease prevention and control system; Demography+demographic cycle; The importance of public health nutrition programs in preventing disease and promoting adult health; Nutritional problems of public health, (global and local)+ low birth weight, Protein energy malnutrition, Xerophalmia, Nutritional anemia; Iodine deficiency disorders, Beriberi and thiamine deficiency; Pellagra; Rickets and osteomalacia; Scurvy; Zinc deficiency; Dental caries and fluorosis; Nutritional neuropathies; Riboflavin deficiency; vitamin B6 deficiency; Minor nutritional disorders and clinical signs.

Practical:

Design a project using one of the epidemiological methods to investigate the nutritional problem in local community and present it with suggested solutions.

Books Recommended:

  1. Michael J. G., Barrie M. M., John N. K. and Lenore A. 2004. Public Health Nutrition. Wiley Blackwell
  2. Sari E. 2011. Nutrition in Public Health, A Handbook for Developing Programs and Services. 3rd edition. Jones and Bartlett Learning International, London, UK.
  3. Mark L. and Worsley T. (Editors). Public Health Nutrition, From Principles to Practice. Allen & Unwin Book Publishers, Australia

DCN -605 Dietetics-2 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to;

  1. Employ and implement nutritional assessment in a clinical setting.
  2. Formulate nutritional management plans for various disease states keeping in mind the disease pathophysioloy, abnormal biochemical status and altered metabolism.
  3. Develop the ability to compose individualized therapeutic diets for texture, consistency and composition which are disease specific, culturally and aesthetically acceptable.
  4. Discuss disease prevention guidelines for major and chronic diseases.
  5. Discuss the importance of nutritional counseling in the prevention of chronic diseases.
  6. Explain the role of nutritional counseling in modifying dietary behavior and lifestyle

Theory:

Diet therapy, principles of diet therapy, modification of normal diet to therapeutic diets, dietary modifications in fevers and infections, modified energy diets; Obesity and malnutrition; Diets in the diseases of the gastrointestinal system; Peptic ulcer, gastritis, constipation, diarrhea, mal+absorption syndrome; Celiac disease, lactose intolerance, diets in cardiovascular diseases; Ischemic heart diseases, Dyslipidemia, hypertension; Diet in renal diseases; Dietary modifications in diabetes mellitus; Diet in the liver diseases; Hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease; Diet in surgical conditions; Pre+operative and post+operative; Diets in inborn errors of metabolism; Diet in deficiency states; Anemia, protein energy malnutrition. Inpatient counseling; Short term and long term nutritional counseling; Diet counseling for prevention of obesity, diabetes, renal diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer and bone diseases; Simulation techniques for counseling in selected settings.

Practical:

Planning a normal diet, texture modified diets; Clear fluid diet, full fluid diet, soft diet, semi+solid diet; Energy modified diets, high calorie diet, restricted calorie diet, bland diet, high fiber diet, low residue diet; Modified carbohydrates diet, moderate carbohydrate diet; Modified proteins diet, high protein diet, restricted protein diet; Modified fats diet, restricted fats diet; Modified micronutrients diet, controlled sodium, potassium and phosphorus diet.

Recommended Books:

  1. Rolfes S. R., Pinna K. 2006. Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition, Thomson/Wadsworth.
  2. Mahan L. K. and Escott+Stump S. 2008. Krause's Food & Nutrition Therapy, Elsevier Saunders.
  3. Whitney E. N. and Rolfes S. R. 2008. Understanding Nutrition, Thomson Higher Education.
  4. King K. and Helm K. K. 2007. Nutrition Therapy: Advanced Counseling Skills, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

DCN- 606 Nutrition and Psychology 2(2+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have knowledge of;

  1. Psychology, its types and importance in nutrition.
  2. Psychological influences on appetite, attitude behavior relationship.

Theory:

Introduction to psychology, types and classification; Psychology and nutrition adherence; Attitude and eating patterns and the field of cognitive psychology; Perception, visualization and eating patterns, errors in perception process; Eating disorders, diagnosis, assessment and treatment; Face perception; Model of food choice, a conceptual model of the food choice; Psychological influences on appetite; Process over the life course, integration of biological, social, cultural and psychological influences on food choice; Attitude behavior relationship; Measurement issues, indirect effects of attitude on behavior; The theory of reasoned action; Additional variables within the theory of planned behavior.

Recommended books:

  1. David B.. 1994. The Psychology of Nutrition. Taylor and Francis.
  2. Jane O. 2010. The Psychology of Eating: From Healthy to Disorders Behavior. 2nd Edition. Wiley Blackwell.
  3. Melinda C. B. and Colleen A. K. 2010. Nutrition Psychology: Improving dietary adherence. Jones and Bartlett Learning Publishers.

DCN -701 Research Planning and Methods in Human Nutrition 3(3+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of course teaching, completion of independent study assignments and appropriate amount of group work, a student will be able to:

  • Prepare various assignments, special problem report, case study report, poster, conference proceeding abstract, research paper, review paper, research proposal / synopsis, research thesis / dissertation, presentations etc.
  • Effectively deliver various scientific presentations like oral, poster, case study, seminar, etc.

Theory:

An introduction to the research process and its application to research in human nutrition. Students will complete a research project of their choice, encompassing the major components of research activity, including a review of the literature, hypotheses generation, data collection and analysis, and discussion. Emphasis will be placed on how to define and approach research problems in a way consistent with the practice of human nutrition professionals. Experience with the use of the SPSS+X computer program is provided.

DCN -702 Food Toxicology and Additives 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have knowledge of;

  1. Different food additives, their permissible limits and safety assessment
  2. CODEX Alimantarius and FDA rules for food additives

Theory:

Introduction to food toxicology; Concepts of toxicology; Dose+response relationship; Pesticide residues in food, absorption, distribution and storage of toxicants; Animal drug residues in food; Veterinary medicine, risks and benefits; Toxicants formed during food processing, biotransformation and elimination of toxicants; Target organ toxicity; Teratogenesis, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, toxic reactions with the molecules of life; Natural toxins in plants and fungi, mold and mycotoxins, marine toxins in food; Naturally occurring toxicants; Etiologic agents of foodborne diseases, bacterial toxigenesis; Food allergy, the basics of food allergens and their effects; Food intolerance and metabolic disorders; Food additives, introduction, types, classification; Food additive safety assessment; Toxicology of selected food additives, preservatives, emulsifiers, flavoring agents, antifoaming, anticaking, antioxidants, bleaching, coloring agents, sweeteners and thickeners; Safety, controlling and regulation of food additives according to CODEX alimentariusand FDA etc.

Practical:

Determination of sulphur dioxide, sodium benzoate, sodium chloride in food samples; Pesticide residues in plant products; Detection of veterinary medicine residues in milk and meat; Heavy metals in water sample; Determination of natural colors.

Recommended Books:

  1. Fergus M. C. 1996. Food Additives: Toxicology, Regulation, and Properties. CRC Press.
  2. Stanley T. O. 2004. Food and Nutritional Toxicology. CRC Press.
  3. Jim S. and Lily H+S. 2011. Food Additives Data Book. 2nd ed. Willey Blackwell publisher.

DCN-703 Traditional and Aboriginal Foods 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

After studying this course and completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, student`s abilities will be empowered in the following fields;

  1. Traditional foods in different parts of the world, what peoples think about these foods and impact of religion/belief.
  2. Important traditional foods of Pakistan, their major components and their impact on health.
  3. Practical analysis of some important traditional foods of Pakistan.

Theory:

Introduction to traditional and aboriginal foods; Ethical considerations and climate factors and their effect on cultural foods; Worldwide traditional foods, nutritional facts and health; Traditional foods in Asia, traditional recipes, their nutritional considerations and their impact of health; Pakistani traditional foods from all provinces, typical recipes like sarson ka saag, corn flour chapattis, panjeeri, their nutrients and impact on health; Thinking's related these foods, nutritional value of these products; Effect of modernization and fast foods on these traditional recipes.

Practical:

Estimation of calorific values of some traditional foods like sarson ka saag, makai ki roti, etc.; Survey in the community to take views for these local recipes, evaluation of some local foods to access their nutritional contents and energy value

Books Recommended:

  1. Ronald F. And Schmid N. D. 1997. Traditional Foods are your Best Medicine: Improving Health and Longevity with Native Nutrition. Inner Traditions.
  2. Pamela G. K., Sucher K. P. and Nelms M. N. 2012. Food and Culture. 6th edition. Wadsworth Cengag Learning, Belmont, USA.

DCN -704 Biotechnology in Nutrition and Dietetics 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

After attending this course and completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, students will be able to know about;

  1. Biotechnology, its important areas in food and nutrition. And how the major components of food and functional foods can be produced using microorganisms?
  2. Food bio+preservatives and the importance of fermentation and starter cultures?
  3. Genetically modified foods, plants and microbes, how they can be produced and what is their role in food and nutrition.

Theory:

Food biotechnology, definition, history, world economics; Future potential and micro+organisms used in food and nutrition biotechnology; Fermentation, role in food processing and nutrition; Starter cultures, their criteria and important starter cultures for food fermentations; Major components of human nutrition and their production using biotechnological approaches; Food additives, colour, flavor, their production through biotechnological approach; Production of microbial polysaccharides and polyunsaturated fatty acids; Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria; Genetically modified microbes and foods, consumer awareness regarding GM foods; Biotechnology and food related disorders.

Practical:

Preparation of selective media for the growth of lactobacilli; Conversion of simple sugars to value added products like prebiotics; Efficacy evaluation of prebiotics; Enzymatic synthesis of prebiotics e.g. galacto+oligosaccharides and fructo+oligosaccharides.

Recommended Books:

  1. Shetty K., Paliyath G., Pommeto, Levin, R. E. 2006. Food Biotechnology. 2nd edition. Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
  2. Stahl U., Donalies U. E. B., and Nevoigt E. 2008. Food Biotechnology. Advances in Biochemical Engineering /Biotechnology. Springer+Verlag Berlin Heiderberg.

DCN-705 DIETETICS-3 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to:

  1. Describe, interpret and be able to apply various nutritional assessment methods to evaluate nutritional status of individuals.
  2. Develop viable nutrition care plans for patients with special conditions requiring nutritional modification for the promotion of health.

Theory:

Principles of clinical dietetics management, medical terminology, medical documentation, design and implementation of nutrition care plans. Begin the application of principles of clinical nutrition to the treatment of disease, drug+nutrient interaction, nutrition assessment and nutritional support. Identify risks for development of chronic disease, including life style choices. Nutritional needs of the patient and apply to specific clinical situations. Nutrition in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, nutritional care in disorders of renal system. Nutrition in surgery and burns, nutritional support for burns. Nutritional care in disorders of the immune system (AIDS). Nutrition in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Nutrition in pulmonary disease. Diseases of infancy and childhood, inborn errors of metabolism and nutritional care of the child with a birth defect. Geriatrics nutritional considerations. Relationship between diseases processes and food intake and the changes in intake required in treatment.

Practical:

Formulate nutrient needs at various times in life and effects of socio+economic and cultural background in planning therapeutic diets for the patient or client. Plan, adopt and adjust nutritionally balanced diets for patients carrying various diseases and apply to specific clinical situations. Appropriate method of feeding and to calculate maternal and parenteral nutrition formulations. Apply dietetic information to individual clinical situations through the use of case studies and diet calculations. An examination of the special nutritional needs of the elderly with emphasis on the different needs of the various subgroups that comprise the elderly today.

Books Recommended:

  1. Birmingham J.J. 1990. Medical Terminology: A Self+Learning Text. 2nd edition. Philadelphia: CV Mosby Company.
  2. Mahan, L.K and Escott+Stump, S. 1996. Krause's Food, Nutrition and Diet Therapy. 10thed. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders.
  3. Pronsky, Z.M. 1993. Powers and Moore's Food Medication Interactions. 8th edition. Pottstown, PA.: Food+Medication Interactions.
  4. Zeman, F.J. Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics. 2nd edition. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co.; 1991.
  5. Phyllis, A.B. 2000. Prescription for Nutritional Healing. Avery penguin Putnam Inc., New York, USA.
  6. Garrow, J.S. & James, W.P.T. 1993. Human Nutrition and Dietetics. Churchill Livinstone, Edinburgh.

DCN-706 Drug-Nutrient Interactions 2(2+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to;

  1. Describe the routes of drug administration and factors that might alter drug absorption and bioavailability.
  2. Describe the effects of various drugs on action, metabolism and elimination of nutrients and the effect of nutrients on the metabolism and absorption of drug.
  3. Identify the risk factors for drug+nutrient interactions
  4. Explain the effects of drug therapy on the nutritional status of patients.

Theory:

Basic definitions and concepts, role of nutrition therapy in pharmacotherapy; Pharmacologic aspects of food and drug interactions; Routes of drug administration; Drug mechanism Pharmacodynamics; Pharmacokinetics, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination; Effects of food on drug therapy, drug absorption, drug distribution, drug metabolism and drug excretion; Effects of drugs on food and nutrition, nutrient absorption, metabolism and excretion; Effects of drugs on the nutritional status of patients e.g. taste, smell and type of intake; Gastrointestinal effects, appetite changes; Nutrient assessment of drug+nutrient interactions; Dietary counseling for the prevention of food drug interactions.

Recommended Books

  1. Mahan, L. K. and Escott+Stump S. 2008. Krause's Food & Nutrition Therapy, Elsevier Saunders.
  2. Nelms M., Sucher K. 2010. Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology, Cengage Learning.
  3. McCabe, J Beverly, Frankel, H Eric.2003.Handbook of Food+Drug Interactions, CRC press

DCN - 801 Community Project 3(0+3*)

Objectives:

  • To choose and describe appropriate strategies for nutrition interventions.
  • To evaluate the process and impact of a nutrition intervention.
  • To prepare a budget for the development and evaluation of a nutrition intervention.
  • To prepare a grant proposal requesting funds for a community nutrition intervention.

Theory

This class provides students with the tools for developing community nutrition interventions. Students will learn about utilizing behavioral theory, conducting needs assessments, writing program objectives, developing intervention strategies, evaluating program implementation and effectiveness, planning a budget, and writing grant proposals. Students pick their projects based on their personal interests and work in small groups of students. Previous examples include: obesity prevention for school+aged children, eating disorder prevention for adolescent girls; increasing whole+grain consumption in college students, and increasing fruit and vegetable intake in preschoolers.

DCN- 802 Food and Drug Laws 2(2+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have knowledge of;

  1. Basics concepts of food and drug Food laws and Regulation
  2. World food and drug laws and situation in Pakistan

Theory:

Introduction to Punjab pure food rules; Legal terms and definitions from the food industry, like bakery, dairy, homogenized milk, processing aid, food testing laboratory, etc.; Rules for food additives, categories like gelling agent, bulking agent, anti+foaming agent, colours, flavours, etc., Permissible limits for these agents; Rules for food preservatives, limits; Food packaging rules, criteria for packaging material, labeling criteria; Duties and responsibilities of public analysts and food inspectors, current situation; Regulations for different food industry products.

Pakistan drug act, 1976 and all the regulations frames the under e.g. registration, sale, import and export of drugs, etc.; All basic definitions in drugs act 1976; Procedures of drug inspectors and their powers; Penalties and procedures.

Recommended books:

  1. Punjab Pure Food Rules, 2011
  2. Goodburn, K. 2001. EU Food Law: A Practical Guide. Woodhead publishing Ltd. CRC press. Boca Raton New York, USA.
  3. Fortin N.D. 2009. Food Regulation: Law, Science, Policy, and Practice. John Willey & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, USA.
  4. Peter B. H., Merrill R. A. and Grossman L. A. 2007. Food and Drug Law. Foundation press

DCN-803 Recent Advances in Clinical Nutrition 2(2+0*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to;

  1. Understand the role of macronutrients and micronutrients in normal physiological pathways.
  2. Identify and explain the role of specific nutrients in the metabolic pathways and in relation to major diseases.
  3. Identifying alternate feeding routes, their relation with the nutritional biochemistry and their application in a clinical setting.
  4. Design enteral and parenteral feeding regimens.

Theory:

Advanced study of principles of nutrition in relation to health and disease; The interrelationships of nutrition with biochemical, physiological and anatomical changes associated with acute, chronic, and terminal illness, surgery, and trauma are explored; Formulation of medical nutrition therapy through advanced nutritional management techniques plans using the Nutrition Care Process framework by determining nutrition diagnoses; Macro/micronutrient and fluid/electrolyte needs; Routes of feeding, and implementation plans; Clinical cases are used to address metabolic, nutrition status and patient applications, topics including diabetes, nutrition support; Enteral and parenteral nutrition; Surgery and critical care, burns, immunology, cancer, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, liver and renal diseases.

Recommended Books:

  1. Mahan, L. K. and S. Escott+Stump. 2008. Krause's Food & Nutrition Therapy, Elsevier Saunders
  2. Nelms, M., Sucher K. 2010. Nutrition Therapy and Pathophysiology, Cengage Learning.
  3. Vishwanath M. S. 2011. Introduction to Clinical Nutrition. 3rd edition. Marcel Dekker, Inc. NY, USA

DCN-804 Nutrition Intervention Planning 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able;

  1. To understand basis of epidemiological concepts and their application.
  2. To conduct community assessment, policy development and implement in novel situations

Theory:

Definition of epidemiology, its principles, uses, methods, observational epidemiology-descriptive and analytical studies; Cross-sectional studies, case control studies, cohort studies, comparison and advantages/disadvantages of case-control and cohort studies; Experimental/ interventional epidemiology-randomized clinical trials; Community based interventional studies; Planning process+ assessment of community nutritional problems; Prioritizing the problem, defining objectives, planning, implementing, monitoring, evaluation and reporting; Food policy councils, Building bridges with other departments.

Practical:

A complete nutrition intervention planning procedure will be followed practically. First step will include plan of descriptive epidemiological study to generate a hypothesis, and at second step the analytical or experimental studies will be planned with budgeting etc.

The specimen of PC+1 submitted by different organizations will also be discussed and analyzed.

Books Recommended:

  1. Walter W. 1998. Nutritional Epidemiology. Oxford University Press, USA; 2nd edition.
  2. Richard D. S.and Martin W. B. 2001. Nutrition and Health in Developing Countries (Nutrition and Health) Humana Press.

DCN-805 Nutritional Education and Awareness 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able;

  1. To learn the techniques of creating awareness about health issues in masses
  2. To learn about different modes of communication and their effective use
  3. To understand the ethical responsibilities for dissemination of knowledge

Theory:

Defining nutrition education, history, need of nutrition education; Nutrition education programme, scope and challenges of educating people about eating well; Implications for competencies and skills for nutrition education; Biological influences, cultural and social preferences; Family and psychological factors; Expectancy+value theories of motivation, social and cognitive theory; Behavior change as a process, phases of change; Addressing multiple and overlapping influences on behavior; A logical model approach for planning a framework of nutrition education; Understanding communication model, preparing/organizing oral presentations, delivering oral presentation, delivering nutrition education workshops, types of supporting visual aids, nutrition mass media communication campaigns, social marketing; Ethics in nutrition education, conflicts, participating process in community coalition; Non+government and public health organizations and their current programmes.

Practical:

Nutritional counseling; Programme designing for specific diseases like Anemia, Neural tube defects, rickets, etc.; Surveys and seminars in different educational institutions; Individual presentations by students on different nutrition topics.

Books Recommended:

  1. Walter W. 1998. Nutritional Epidemiology. 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, USA.
  2. Richard D. S. and Martin W. B. 2001. Nutrition and Health in Developing Countries (Nutrition and Health) Humana Press.

DCN -806 Sports Nutrition 3(2+1*)

Learning objectives:

At the end of this course and following completion of an appropriate amount of independent study, a student will be able to have understanding of;

  1. Energy requirements of athletes, body builders, etc.
  2. Examine methods of increasing muscle mass and to assess the use of sports supplements

Theory:

The principles of fitness, motivation and conditioning; Nutrition for the athletes, stress management, preventing accidents, stretching, posture and aerobics; Vitamins and minerals supplementation for fitness; High and low intensity exercise, cross training, walking for weight control and case studies; Introduction to muscle contraction, fast and slow fibers, how and where energy is stored? How far can a person run? What fuels are used for exercise?; When is each fuel used, different intensity, duration, training, nutrition and gender?; Energy balance, fluid balance, fueling cycle, what can food does for you?; Pre+exercise, during exercise and during recovery; Athletes eating plan, calorie goals, calorie values, carbohydrate goals, protein goals, fat, vitamins and mineral goals; Sports drink and supplementation; My pyramid+ for sports man; National and international regulations for supplements.

Practical:

Diet planning for different sportsmen like body builders, athletes, swimmers, etc.

Recommended Books:

  1. Ronald J. M. 2000. Nutrition in Sport. Blackwell Science Ltd.
  2. Judy A. D. 2007. Sports Nutrition Fats and Proteins. CRC Press Taylor and Francis Group.
  3. Heather H. F., Burgoon L. and Mikesky A. E. 2008. Practical Applications in Sports Nutrition. 3rd edition. Jones & Bartlett Learning Publishers, London, UK.

ISL-101 - ISLAMIC STUDIES/ETHICS - 2(2+0)

ETHICS (FOR NON MUSLIMS)

Course Contents :

Objectives:

This course is aimed at:

  1. To provide Basic information about Islamic Studies
  2. To enhance understanding of the students regarding Islamic Civilization
  3. To improve Students skill to perform prayers and other worships
  4. To enhance the skill of the students for understanding of issues related to faith and religious life.

Detail of Courses:

Introduction to Quranic Studies

  1. Basic Concepts of Quran
  2. History of Quran
  3. Uloom-ul-Quran

Study of Selected Text of Holly Quran

  1. Verses of Surah Al-Baqarah Related to Faith (Verse No+284+286)
  2. Verses of Surah Al-Hujurat Related to Adab Al-Nabi (Verse No+1+18)
  3. Verses of Surah al-Mu'minun Related to Characteristics of faithful (Verse No+1+11)
  4. Verses of Surah aliFurqan Related to Social Ethics (Verse No.63+77)
  5. Verses of Surah Al-Anam Related to Ahkam (Verse No+152+154)

60

Study of Selected Text of Holly Quran

  1. Verses of Surah Al-Ahzab Related to Adab al-Nabi (Verse No.6,21,40,56,57,58.)
  2. Verses of Surah Al-Hashar (18,19,20) Related to thinking, Day of Judgment
  3. Verses of Surah Al-Saf Related to Tafakar, Tadabar (Verse No+1,14)

Seerat of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) I

  1. Life of Muhammad Bin Abdullah ( Before Prophet Hood)
  2. Life of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) in Makkah
  3. Important Lessons Derived from the life of Holy Prophet in Makkah

Seerat of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) II

  1. Life of Holy Prophet (S.A.W) in Madina
  2. Important Events of Life Holy Prophet in Madina
  3. Important Lessons Derived from the life of Holy Prophet in Madina

Introduction To Sunnah

  1. Basic Concepts of Hadith
  2. History of Hadith
  3. Kinds of Hadith
  4. Uloom-ul-Hadith
  5. Sunnah & Hadith
  6. Legal Position of Sunnah

Selected Study from Text of Hadith

Introduction To Islamic Law & Jurisprudence

  1. Basic Concepts of Islamic Law & Jurisprudence
  2. History & Importance of Islamic Law & Jurisprudence
  3. Sources of Islamic Law & Jurisprudence
  4. Nature of Differences in Islamic Law
  5. Islam and Sectarianism

Islamic Culture & Civilization

  1. Basic Concepts of Islamic Culture & Civilization
  2. Historical Development of Islamic Culture & Civilization
  3. Characteristics of Islamic Culture & Civilization
  4. Islamic Culture & Civilization and Contemporary Issues

Islam & Science

  1. Basic Concepts of Islam & Science
  2. Contributions of Muslims in the Development of Science
  3. Quranic & Science

61

Islamic Economic System

  1. Basic Concepts of Islamic Economic System
  2. Means of Distribution of wealth in Islamic Economics
  3. Islamic Concept of Riba
  4. Islamic Ways of Trade & Commerce

Political System of Islam

  1. Basic Concepts of Islamic Political System
  2. Islamic Concept of Sovereignty
  3. Basic Institutions of Govt. in Islam

Islamic History

  1. Period of Khilafat-e-Rashida
  2. Period of Ummayyads
  3. Period of Abbasids

Social System of Islam

  1. Basic Concepts of Social System of Islam
  2. Elements of Family
  3. Ethical Values of Islam

Reference Books:

  1. Hameed ullah Muhammad, "Emergence of Islam" , IRI, Islamabad
  2. Hameed ullah Muhammad, "Muslim Conduct of State"
  3. Hameed ullah Muhammad, 'Introduction to Islam
  4. Mulana Muhammad Yousaf Islahi,"
  5. Hussain Hamid Hassan, "An Introduction to the Study of Islamic Law" leaf Publication Islamabad, Pakistan.
  6. Ahmad Hasan, "Principles of Islamic Jurisprudence" Islamic Research Institute, International Islamic University, Islamabad (1993)
  7. Mir Waliullah, "Muslim Jurisprudence and the Quranic Law of Crimes" Islamic Book Service (1982)
  8. H.S. Bhatia, "Studies in Islamic Law, Religion and Society" Deep & Deep Publications New Delhi (1989)
  9. Dr. Muhammad Zia+ul+Haq, "Introduction to Al Sharia Al Islamia" Allama Iqbal Open University, Islamabad (2001)

CS-102 - Introduction to Computers - 3(3+0)

Course Contents:

Definition

Usage and functionality of computers, Limitations of Computers, Classification of Computers, Basic Components of Computers.

Hardware

Software

System Software, Application Software, Equipment's/ devices in Personal computer system Input devices, Output devices, Storage devices, The processor

Microsoft Windows

Introduction to MS+Windows

Arranging, Moving and Resizing Windows. Identifying the components of desktop. Moving, Changing and Closing Windows. Crating, Opening and Deleting items and folders.Working with My Computer Deleting and Resume Print Jobs. Using Control Panel, Working with Accessories.

Microsoft Office

Microsoft Win Word

Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Power Point

Database

Internet and Email

Introduction To Outlook Express

Using Internet Explorer

ENG-200 - ENGLISH - II (Communication Skills) 3(3+0)

Course Contents :

Objectives:

Enable the students to meet their real life communication needs.

Course Contents:

Paragraph writing

Practice in writing a good, unified and coherent paragraph

Essay writing

Introduction

CV and job application

Translation skills

Urdu to English

Study skills

Skimming and scanning, intensive and extensive, and speed reading, summary and précis writing and comprehension

Academic skills

Letter/memo writing, minutes of meetings, use of library and internet

Presentation skills

Personality development (emphasis on content, style and pronunciation)

Note: Documentaries to be shown for discussion and review

56

Recommended Books:

Communication Skills

a) Grammar

  1. Practical English Grammar by A.J. Thomson and A.V. Martinet. Exercises 2. 3rd Edition. Oxford University Press 1986. ISBN 0 19 431350 6.

b) Writing

  1. Writing. Intermediate by Marie+Chrisitine Boutin, Suzanne Brinand and Francoise Grellet. Oxford Supplementary Skills. Fourth Impression 1993. ISBN 019 435405 7 Pages 45+53 (note taking).
  2. Writing. Upper+Intermediate by Rob Nolasco. Oxford Supplementary Skills. Fourth Impression 1992. ISBN 0 19 435406 5 (particularly good for writing memos, introduction to presentations, descriptive and argumentative writing).

c) Reading

  1. Reading. Advanced. Brian Tomlinson and Rod Ellis. Oxford Supplementary Skills. Third Impression 1991. ISBN 0 19 4534030.
  2. Reading and Study Skills by John Langan
  3. Study Skills by Riachard York.

PAK- 201 PAKISTAN STUDIES 2(2+0)

Course Contents :

Introduction/ Objectives:

  • Develop vision of historical perspective, government, politics, contemporary Pakistan, ideological background of Pakistan.
  • Study the process of governance, national development, issues arising in the modern age and posing challenges to Pakistan.

Course Outlines:

1. Historical Perspective

  1. Ideological rationale with special reference to Sir Syed Ahmed Khan, Allama Muhammad Iqbal and Quaid+i+Azam M. Ali Jinnah.
  2. Factors leading to Muslim separatism
  3. People and Land
  1. Indus Civilization
  2. Muslim advent
  3. Location and geo+physical features.

2. Government and Politics in Pakistan

Political and constitutional phases:

  1. 1947+58
  2. 1958+71
  3. 1971+77
  4. 1977+88
  5. 1988+99
  6. 1999 onward

3. Contemporary Pakistan

  1. Economic institutions and issues
  2. Society and social structure
  3. Ethnicity
  4. Foreign policy of Pakistan and challenges
  5. Futuristic outlook of Pakistan

Books Recommended:

  1. Burki, Shahid Javed. State & Society in Pakistan, The Macmillan Press Ltd 1980.
  2. Akbar, S. Zaidi. Issue in Pakistan's Economy. Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2000.
  3. S.M. Burke and Lawrence Ziring. Pakistan's Foreign policy: An Historical analysis. Karachi: Oxford University Press, 1993.
  4. Mehmood, Safdar. Pakistan Political Roots & Development. Lahore, 1994.
  5. Wilcox, Wayne. The Emergence of Bangladesh., Washington: American Enterprise, Institute of Public Policy Research, 1972.
  6. Mehmood, Safdar. Pakistan Kayyun Toota, Lahore: Idara+e+Saqafat+e+Islamia, Club Road, nd. 59
  7. Amin, Tahir. Ethno + National Movement in Pakistan, Islamabad: Institute of Policy Studies, Islamabad.
  8. Ziring, Lawrence. Enigma of Political Development. Kent England: WmDawson & sons Ltd, 1980.
  9. Zahid, Ansar. History & Culture of Sindh. Karachi: Royal Book Company, 1980.
  10. Afzal, M. Rafique. Political Parties in Pakistan, Vol. I, II & III. Islamabad: National Institute of Historical and cultural Research, 1998.
  11. Sayeed, Khalid Bin. The Political System of Pakistan. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1967.
  12. Aziz, K.K. Party, Politics in Pakistan, Islamabad: National Commission on Historical and Cultural Research, 1976.
  13. Muhammad Waseem, Pakistan Under Martial Law, Lahore: Vanguard, 1987.
  14. Haq, Noor ul. Making of Pakistan: The Military Perspective. Islamabad: National Commission on Historical and Cultural Research, 1993.

ENG-300 ENGLISH-III (Technical and Report Writing) 3(3+0)

Course Contents :

Objectives:

Enhance language skills and develop critical thinking

Course Contents:

Presentation skills

Essay writing

Descriptive, narrative, discursive, argumentative

Academic writing

How to write a proposal for research paper/ term paper

How to write a research paper/term paper (emphasis on style, content,language, form, clarity, consistency)

Technical Report writing

Progress report writing

Note: Extensive reading is required for vocabulary building

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Recommended Books:

Technical Writing and Presentation Skills

a) Essay Writing and Academic Writing

  1. Writing. Advanced by Ron White. Oxford Supplementary Skills. Third Impression 1992. ISBN 0 19 435407 3 (particularly suitable for discursive, descriptive, argumentative and report writing).
  2. College Writing Skills by John Langan. McGraw+Hill Higher Education. 2004.
  3. Patterns of College Writing (4th edition) by Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell. St. Martin's Press.

b) Presentation Skills

c ) Reading

The Mercury Reader. A Custom Publication. Compiled by norther Illinois University. General Editiors: Janice Neulib; Kathleen Shine Cain; Stephen Ruffus and Maurice Scharton. (A reader which will give students exposure to the best of twentieth century literature, without taxing the taste of engineering students).

MAT-301 - MATHEMATICS - 3(3+0)

COURSES FOR BS (4 YEAR)

(FOR STUDENTS NOT MAJORING IN MATHEMATICS)

1. COURSE FOR NON+MATHEMATICS MAJORS IN SOCIAL

Course Contents:

SCIENCES

Title of subject: MATHEMATICS

Discipline BS (Social Sciences).

Pre-requisites: SSC (Metric) level Mathematics

Credit Hours 03 + 00

Minimum Contact Hours: 40

Assessment Written examination;

Effective : 2008 and onward

Aims:

To give the basic knowledge of Mathematics and prepare the students not majoring in mathematics.

Objectives:

After completion of this course the student should be able to:

  • Understand the use of the essential tools of basic mathematics;
  • Apply the concepts and the techniques in their respective disciplines;
  • Model the effects non+isothermal problems through different domains;

Contents:

Algebra:

Preliminaries: Real and complex numbers, Introduction to sets, set operations, functions, types of functions. Matrices: Introduction to matrices, types of matrices, inverse of matrices, determinants, system of linear equations, Cramer's rule. Quadratic equations: Solution of quadratic equations, nature of roots of quadratic equations, equations reducible to quadratic equations. Sequence and Series: Arithmetic, geometric and harmonic progressions. Permutation and combinations: Introduction to permutation and combinations, Binomial Theorem: Introduction to binomial theorem. Trigonometry: Fundamentals of trigonometry, trigonometric identities. Graphs: Graph of straight line, circle and trigonometric functions. frequency polygon, cumulative frequency curve. Measures of central tendency: Mean medium and modes, quartiles, deciles and percentiles. Measures of dispersion: Range, inter quartile deviation mean deviation, standard deviation, variance, moments, skewness and kurtosis.

Recommended Books:

  1. Swokowski. E. W., 'Fundamentals of Algebra and Trigonometry', Latest Edition.
  2. Kaufmann. J. E., 'College Algebra and Trigonometry', PWS+Kent Company, Boston, Latest Edition.
  3. Walpole, R. E., 'Introduction of Statistics', Prentice Hall, Latest Edition.
  4. Wilcox, R. R., 'Statistics for The Social Sciences',

ENG-400 - English IV - 3(3+0)

(Advanced academic R&W)

Course Contents :

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

The goal of this course is to enhance awareness of students for how modern day biochemical studies are carried out using state+of+the+art instruments, how data is generated, critically evaluated and analyzed. The course also prepares students in report writing, preparing and making scientific presentations and surveying of literature.

COURSE OUTLINES:

Involves extensive reading of modern day biochemistry literature, designing experiments as well as projects, and critical evaluation of literature. Three key areas to be covered are: 39

  • RESEARCH PROCESS, DESIGN & METHODOLOGY:

Project selection and its development, role of students & supervisor, experimental design and investigation, methodology, control, sampling methods replicating & data processing, results interpretation, primary and secondary sources, scientific research, scientific record keeping;

  • WRITING, PRESENTATION AND PUBLISHING SCIENTIFIC

PAPERS: Importance of research report, thesis and scientific paper. Report writing and its presentation: Role of P value in decision making,  conflict of interests, ownership of data, consent form, publication of the research paper: selection of journal, instructions to authors, letter to editor, acknowledgement, Referee's comments and suggestions, sending a revised manuscript and acceptance letter.

  • REVIEW & SYNOPSIS:

The student in consultation with the supervisor will prepare an extensive review and design a research plan in the area of interest, based on introduction, literature survey, problem statement, objectives, methodology, significance and limitations.

Practical:

A variety of activities including seminars on assigned topic, written essays, poster presentation, presentation of research publications, etc will be undertaken though out the semester. Reference indexing. Similarity index and Plagiarism Checking

Recommended Books

  1. Graduate research: A guide for students in the science (1998) 3 Rev Sub edition by Robert V. Smith University of Washington Press.
  2. Writing, Reading & Research Clifford (1985) by R. Veit, and J. Clifford Bobbs+Merrill Educational Pubications.
  3. Practical Research: Planning & Design (2009) by P.D. Leedy and J.F., Ormrod Publishers: Merrill.
  4. Research methods: A process of Inquiry by Grazinao & Ranlin (2006)
  5. Conducting Research Literature Reviews: From the Internet to Paper (2004) by A. G. Fink. Saga Publications.